What are core areas IT hiring managers are looking for?

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A+
Certifications
IT careers
IT jobs
Network+
I've completed A+, and I'm about to take my Network+ test in a 2 weeks. If you were a hiring manager that took notice to my A+ and Network+, what are 3-4 of the "most current core areas" and "strong technical gifts" that you would use to rate me as an asset to your team or any organization's team? I want to be confident that if nothing else, a manager can see strong potential. Because jobs are a little tight. I want to be well rounded and that may give me flexibility in various roles. Thanks. Moderator Note: This is a submitted question.

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I’ll assume you’re looking for entry level jobs. As thats basically where those certs will land you, and
they should, thats their job.

If you’re aiming for anything higher than Level 1 tech / Jr Admin then you’re aiming too high, you won’t
get consideration.

Regardless they’re good certs, I hold them, and I think they prove you know the basics at least, and
they should be used as just that, confirmation.

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

These are good entry level certifications and would at least get an attention. Besides the certs, I would recommend to try to do freelance IT stuff at your local church, school functions even if its non-paid. Then if you do get those IT work for those, I would ask those for a letter of recommendation. This is something you can add to your resume and kinda stand out from the “crowd” per say. Also keep your resume focused on your strengths and skill sets. Whenever possible get thos letter of recommendations scanned to pdf and then you can always add it as a reference letter.

Start with companies that are into hardware repair business. Think bestbuy geeksquad kind of places.
With those certs, you would be a good fit there, and then you keep moving up.
You definitely want to be able to speak to each and every technical term that you put down on your resume. Think of some situations where you fixed something that wasnt easy. Think of another where you had to handle a difficult customer/situation and how did you manage that.
Soft skills are equally important as the hard tech skills.

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  • Stiltner
    I'll chime back in, becuase my initial answer was quick (place I volunteer at is moving offices, so its been a chaotic good time). Yes, absolutely search out volunteer opportunities. Most of these organizations have volunteers that come and go here and there, and don't give them any long term ability to plan around their volunteer options. So volunteers end up being short term options, not vital assets to the organizations like they can be (and in some cases are, its not everyone). If you can commit to a place for say 10 hours a week of your time, and do that for 6 months to a year you're going to get to learn a lot of stuff, and you're going to really get a good feel for something that you'll probably just plain love to do. If you want to stand out from the crowd, absolutely do just that. I've loved volunteering, as a matter of fact I put in 35-40 hours volunteering this week (normally I do 15-20 a week), and my actual paying job I worked 18 hours. You get to meet good people, get good contacts, and maybe down the road, a turn around and come back for a job when their needs are there. Go here and you'll get a good lead for options in your local areas. Thats where I found mine, and this one was only a flood of choices. They want good people, they need good people, and if you want to help them, you can also long term help yourself.
    report

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