TCP/IP limits on routers/switches

365 pts.
Tags:
AS/400
Routers
Switches
TCP/IP
Does anyone know if there are limits using a router/switch or separate routers and switches for the number of users online (not twinax local terminals but remote terminals) concurrently? I know multiplexers on mainframes would allow modems to allow many terminals at one time...and the terminalID would be included with data stream for each respective terminal I had Comcast...and for business they provide a router...but it uses the local '10.xxx.xx' local addresses and may restrict incoming access. Is there any equipment that if this is true, would be a workaround (e.g. 100 remote terminal accesses concurrent) for this? The other local addresses are the usual 192.168.xx.xx on Motorola braodband modem/router available in stores...I would imagine DSL service companies would have those same local addresses for getting an AS/400 or iSeries online and accessible to many multiple users concurrently...thanks in advance

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Your router and switches just assist in getting users conencted to your LAN/WAN and have no bearing on how many concurrent Terminal Services / telnet clients your server can support – thats a server config issue…

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  • TomLiotta
    (e.g. 100 remote terminal accesses concurrent) Can you describe "terminal accesses" a little? Is this simple character-based terminal I/O or is it 'workstation' access to LAN facilities? The IP address on the external side of the router shouldn't be a '10.xxx.xx' nor a '192.168.xx.xx' address. Those are two of the IP address ranges that are specifically used on the network portion that is on the inside of a router. The router will have an internal as well as an external address. The '10.xxx.xx' or '192.168.xx.xx' address would be used from inside to reach the router to route to the other side. A technology such as NAT (Network Address Translation) would be used by the router to translate the internal address to an external address. The internal address that gets translated would be the address of the device (e.g., a PC) that is looking to reach the outside. The translated address keeps the outside from knowing what goes on inside, among other things. Tom
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  • Gmil494
    Yes, the external IP address would be assigned by the ISP, and I would prefer a static IP address (Comcast charges $5 more for a static IP address) for terminal emulation. What I'm trying to do is have multiple (either thin client 5250, PCs emulating TN5250 terminals) external terminal sessions available (multiple users/terminals external to the machine location) so that multiple users could log on and use the iSeries machine... If a router or router/switch will work then it should be possible to have multiple users from various locations access the iSeries machine as TN5250 terminals (from PC, thin client, etc). I don't recall when I tested an older AS/400 if multple users were testing / using the system once it was put online...via a static IP address and an 8 port switch... Somehow some tech I though when installing my Comcast Business Class mode/router said there was some restriction built into that device...something that was not present in a non-commerical Comcast account.
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  • TomLiotta
    I don't have experience in that particular area, so I can't help much. I wanted to keep the thread alive in hopes that it would catch the eye of someone who knew. General terminal access is low-volume compared to LAN communications or web serving. But telnet is a 'stateful' connection. I imagine it requires a little more management. Also, iSeries Access generally will want multiple ports open in order to perform signon and licensing checks. Basic TN5250 (or better, TN5250E) should stay limited to the telnet port. Personally, I'd call my ISP first. They should have sufficient knowledge of equipment compatible for your needs (or they shouldn't be in business, IMO.) I hope someone with clear experience sees these go through the daily notices. Tom
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  • Gmil494
    I appreciate your response - maybe someone with specific iSeries/System i/Power Systems network experience can answer this question... I'm basically trying to determine if there will or won't be a restriction to the number of terminals, sessions (remote signon and sessions) via equipment I have (4 port router I have now....) and what the ISP provides...if the ISP restricts it...I'll find a better ISP.
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  • TomLiotta
    ...with specific iSeries/System i/Power Systems network experience... It shouldn't need anyone with any iSeries experience. You'll want someone who knows ISP standard practices and related stuff. E.g., what account options allow multiple concurrent telnet sessions to a server, which routers are appropriate, etc. The target server could be anything. The knowledge needed is in the network connection equipment and how it relates to the ISP account options. Tom
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  • Gmil494
    In that case I think I know someone that I have already talked to that is willing to set up the network/routers, etc for me. Appreciate your reply.
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