Symantec Ghost automated backup/cloning

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Hi there I'm trying to get my parents a nice backup system. By using ghost I wanna see if it can be possible for them to use like a desktop icon to click once (or as few clicks as possible) and their system to be backed up to another drive. I want to use Ghost 2004 or 2005. They don't know much about pc's, so a batch file to be run would be good so that they can do it on their own and not struggle. I've seen some scripts, but need to know what is easiest and maybe a script or two will help... :) Thank you for your time and help in advance W

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Have not used Ghost for this purpose, so can’t help with any scripts etc. This is therefore just a bit of general advice on setting up Backups for inexperienced users.
Main problem is when they recognise that something is wrong, in many cases they will carry on making backups after problems have already arisen, overwriting any good copies that exist. For best security you will need to set up two seperate Backups, one to do a master backup that you can fall back on, if serious problems arise, and one that they can carry out regularly themselves. Ghost is a good option for the first case, but a simple file copy may be better for the regular backups, as this is easier to restore if any problems do arise, and can also be restored after the master backup has been restored to recover current data files.

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  • Avabhinesh
    since it is not possible to do much on command line arguments with ghost i don't think it will be usefull for ur purpose.But u can make a batch file,by using pukzip utility u want to code a lot of lines and finally u will get a zip file of ur entire data. thanks..
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  • Howard2nd
    BEFORE you go all technical overkill, have you looked at 'System Restore' in XP? Can be set for automatic saves. Easy to use, my Mother thinks anything outside 'Word' is too difficult and can make it work. A master setup Ghost Image for major re-installs is not a bad idea. But for daily use it gets complicated quickly. Good luck.
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  • PLSmith65
    Ghost is a great product, but Symantec has another product that I think it better suited for this purpose. It's called LiveState Recovery for Desktops. Backups can be scheduled, incrementals, etc. and what it does is basically a combination of what Ghost and NTBackup do. It creates an image file of the drive, but while the system is live. No more booting to alternative media. It is meant to be used while the system is still in use and you can pull files back from the image like with Ghost Explorer. Check it out. Try an 30 day eval.
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  • PLSmith65
    Ghost is a great product, but Symantec has another product that I think it better suited for this purpose. It's called LiveState Recovery for Desktops. Backups can be scheduled, incrementals, etc. and what it does is basically a combination of what Ghost and NTBackup do. It creates an image file of the drive, but while the system is live. No more booting to alternative media. It is meant to be used while the system is still in use and you can pull files back from the image like with Ghost Explorer. Check it out. Try an 30 day eval.
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  • ColinNZ
    We do the following on laptops using Ghost: Partition hard drive into c: d: & (hidden). c: = up to 15 Gb - system files, programs, and system/user settings. NTFS d: = The rest of the drive (minus 100Mb). NTFS. All user data is stored here. (Documents/email/address book etc). Hidden partition - no drive letter: Win98 DOS partition containing Ghost. Bootable at startup using the WinNT/Win2k/WinXP boot loader (since you have it already). Once the user is happy with the way their PC is set up - they boot to the Win98 partition, execute a batch file which makes a ghost image of c: drive into an image file located on their d: drive. Note: this does not back up user data, as that's stored on D, and is backed up via other means (see below). We've used this several times when out laptop users overseas have been struck down by virus/worm/operator stupidity and have been left with non bootable laptops. Simply power up - select "Recovery" (Win98) partition. Run batch file which uses ghost to restore c: drive to known good state (Leaving user data intact since it's on d:). 10 min later you have a good PC (~10 min if image of c: is approx 2Gb). This setup has saved our business thousands of $$ when our travelling users have had operating system corruption. User data backup on laptops is being addressed seperately using: 1. External USB hard drives (ie 80Gb) & 2. Sync software such as Acronis True Image (http://www.acronis.com/) Our Ghost system simply allows very quick recovery from operating system/application/& user setting corruption. Several steps further than XP's system restore can achieve - although this is pretty good in a few cases (unless virus/worm activity is involved. One issue... when c: is restored, the user must then log on with the password they used at the time the image was created... see the problem? (What was my password 6 months ago?) Colin
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