STMF

5 pts.
Tags:
AS/400
STMF
What is STMF in AS/400?

Software/Hardware used:
as400

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STMF is Stream File. It is stored on the IFS.

For more information.

http://www.ibm.com/systems/i/infocenter/
More specifically: Searching the IBM i 7.1 InfoCenter on the following tokens yielded the below URL along with both the drill-down navigation and a quoted snippet of text:

  stream file stmf
http://pic.dhe.ibm.com/infocenter/iseries/v7r1m0/topic/ifs/rzaaxstmfile.htm

IBM i 7.1 Information Center -> Files and file systems -> Integrated file system -> Integrated file system concepts

Stream file

A stream file is a randomly accessible sequence of
bytes, with no further structure imposed by the system.

The integrated file system provides support for storing and
operating on information in the form of
stream files. Documents that are stored
in your system’s folders are
stream files. Other examples of stream files
are PC files and the files in UNIX systems. An integrated file system
stream file is a system object that has an object type of *STMF.

 …”

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  • TomLiotta

    It is stored on the IFS.

    Note that all files (and all programs, all data queues, all job queues, all libraries, in fact all objects that you can access) are stored in the IFS.

    Tom

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  • RegnadKcin57
    While all files (and all objects in a library, including *LIB objects in the machine context; aka QSYS) are stored in the Integrated File System, those are limited to the /QSYS.LIB file system. IMO it is not helpful to retort about the integrated nature of the IFS without explaining it; i.e. if someone is using the term IFS to imply something about non-QSYS files, that is different than someone not understanding the concept of IFS, but if someone really does not understand the IFS, then a retort that merely alludes that everything is part of IFS does not seem very helpful.
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  • TomLiotta

    ...if someone really does not understand the IFS, then a retort that merely alludes that everything is part of IFS does not seem very helpful.

    Not a "retort", just a clarifying statement. Possibly not helpful. but it might also not be helpful to perpetuate a misconception. It is simply incorrect imply that the IFS does not include all objects that are accessible to application developers.

    The /QSYS.LIB file system is one of many file systems and it has its restrictions. Each of the various file systems has its particular restrictions.

    The IFS provides streamfile interfaces for objects even in the /QSYS.LIB file system. For example, a *USRSPC object is presented through IFS interfaces as a streamfile. That allows it to be the source for a CPYFRMSTMF command or for the open(), read() and other APIs. It also allows them to be accessed with Notepad or other Windows or Unix functions just as a .TXT file might be.

    If expansion is needed on the IFS, a discussion dialog is useful. A fundamental definition of the IFS comes from What the integrated file system is:

    • The integrated file system is a part of the IBM® i operating system that supports stream input/output and storage management similar to personal computer and UNIX operating systems, while providing an integrating structure over all information stored on your system.
    • The integrated file system comprises 10 file systems, each with its own set of logical structures and rules for interacting with information in storage.

    The 'integrated' interfaces across all file systems is the basis of the 'Integrated' File System (IFS). The single set of integrated interfaces is what makes it so useful. It's why the SAV command can be used over any file system.

    By keeping the 'I'FS concepts always in mind, developers have a better chance of applying useful methods regardless of the object. I'd say that a developer who doesn't yet know what a "STMF" is needs as much accuracy as possible.

    A wrong direction at this stage can lead to many confusions later. Too many experienced developers already miss some basic principles.

    Tom

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