split static ips between different machines

5 pts.
Tags:
Netgear WGR614
Router configuration
Routers
Static IP address
I am on a cable connection wiht a 5port switch and a router (wgr614v7) I have my router attached to the switch pulling a DHCP lease from ISP, which runs the majority of my house), and my server is connected to the switch pulling 5 statics off one of the three nics installed. one nic is disabled, and one nic is running to the router for a VNC connection. I just purchased another server and two more little desktops, the desktops are likely to be DHCP'd so those are not an issue. The server however I need to have 3 of my 5 static ip's going to. leaving 2 of them on the current server. My current server DOES have an empty NIC I can use if I need to server server #2 through that server, please help it's driving me bonkers.
ASKED: July 8, 2009  8:55 PM
UPDATED: July 9, 2009  1:10 PM

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The answer to restore your sanity is to configure the router to use NAT (Network Address Translation). That way your servers use private (RFC1918) addresses within your LAN, as do any other devices. The servers need fixed addresses, but everything else can use DHCP (exclude the addresses used for the servers). NAT will also allow all the other devices to communicate to the Internet, which you probably already have configured.

Then the router translates one of the ‘real’ static addresses and translates it to the private address that the server is actually using. For better security, limit the NAT to only the service (TCP port) you need translated, so if it is a web server only nat traffic to TCP port 80. That way you only need one NIC card on any of the servers. Also is the servers are providing access on different ports, say one is a web server and another is a mail server, they can both have the same external IP address, but the NAT translates the specific port to the correct private address, so you save on the number of fixed ‘real’ IP addresses you need.

Even cheap routers should allow you do do this. Look for Address Translation, or port translation, something like that.

Also remember to disable any services on the servers that are not needed, it helps to protect against attacks. And finally, make sure you have a good firewall if you are exposing any server to the Internet (the firewall could also do the NAT if the router can not).

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