Signing onto i520 in Restricted State

15 pts.
Tags:
AS/400
i520
Is there any way that I can access my system remotely if the system is in restricted state. I need to start doing SAVSYS's on a more regular basis and don't want to have to keep going into work to be able to do so. I currently access remotely using tcp/ip but obviously, the subsystems are down for this. I have set up a session that jcomes in QCTL but this will not help for this Regards, Julie

Software/Hardware used:
i520

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  • Lovemyi
    If you have LAN console set up for the console then you can either set up your laptop with an secondary LAN console which cold cause problems if the VPN link you are using crashes or better yet connect to the LAN Console PC with a utility like Dameware, RDP or PC anywhere. Then VPN into the office, connect to that PC with one of the take over software and then use the console to put the machine in restricted mode and then perform your restricted state backup. Or use a backup software like Robot Save or IBM BRMS and put the console in save mode before leaving the office for the weekend. I prefer the first option above as it gives you complete mobility to manage the system from anywhere you have a good internet connection and you can even do PTF updates and Upgrades remote this way in a completely restricted state. Hope this helps. Lovemyi
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  • Lovemyi
    Also if you are still using Twinaxe as your console then the only way to make this work is to get a twinaxe emulation card for a PC and then again follow the fist option I outlined above. Once you have a PC connection the rest is simple. Lovemyi
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  • Stiloabarthian
    If you are on V5R3 or later, you can run a SAVSYS in batch as long as you put together a CL program and the job is submitted to jobq QCTL. The CL should contain: ENDSBS SBS(*ALL) OPTION(*IMMED) BCHTIMLMT(720) The BCHTIMLMT is the amount of time, in minutes, used to bring the system “back to life” in case there is a problem. You can then add a SAVSYS and any other save commands you like. Cheers Ian
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  • TomLiotta
    Probably the first question that needs an answer is "Why do you want regular SAVSYS saves?" What can you do with one from today that you couldn't do with one from a month or two ago? Generally, the differences will be in what can be saved with SAVCFG and SAVSECDTA. But since neither of those require restricted state, the issue mostly doesn't exist. Beyond SAVCFG and SAVSECDTA, there can be potential complications from PTFs. You could (and probably should) handle those by doing your SAVSYSs as a step that completes a general cume PTF package installation. It's possible that a few individual PTFs might be loaded/applied at odd intervals, however those can usually be handled simply by reapplying them after the system is back up. PTFs affect SAVSYS procedures differently for different sites. If you apply a cume package once every six months, then there's practically no use for a SAVSYS that's less than six months old. Tom
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  • Splat
    SAVSYS before PTFs, not after. A backup doesn't do you much good if it saves a mangled OS.
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  • TomLiotta
    SAVSYS before PTFs, not after. A backup doesn’t do you much good if it saves a mangled OS. You should already have a SAVSYS from after the previous PTFs. Why create a new copy? The first "SAVSYS" is the initial install media. There's no point in doing a SAVSYS until after whatever initial cume package, etc., is applied. Subsequent SAVSECDTA/SAVCFG may be done regularly until the next cume package. Before the next cume package, there is then nothing new to be saved. But after, the new SAVSYS contains a neatly configured set of system files. Tom
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  • Splat
    Belt & suspenders. I've had too many tapes go bad, always at critical moments, over the years.
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  • TomLiotta
    Belt & suspenders. That effectively argues for running SAVSYS twice instead of once. It could be before or after an action such as cume PTF application. For "belt & suspenders" protection, it also argues for using tapes from two different vendors for the two save operations. Tapes commonly go bad in groups, perhaps due to flucuations in materials or procedures during manufacturing. If two vendors are impractical, then tapes from two separate manufacturing runs are next best. Serial numbers or similar identifiers might be used to choose from production runs. Tape storage and handling might also be reviewed. E.g., storage on edge can be significantly better than allowing tapes to lie on their faces for extended periods. Temperature, humidity, static electricity and, of course, magnetic or electrical fields are to be controlled. Tape mechanisms can be cleaned regularly. Regardless, if time permits and resources are available, it's better to have extra copies than to have one less copy than what is needed at a given time. Yet, resources are the most common lack. No spare tapes. No spare time. No spare body to handle tapes. No decent storage location. And those are the things addressed by paring back on unnecessary resource wasters such as SAVSYS on a weekly or even monthly basis. It simply doesn't add significant value to anything when SAVSECDTA and SAVCFG are regularly saved anyway. Technically, what extra SAVSYS's might do is add wear to tapes and tape drives making each save potentially less reliable. Tom
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  • Splat
    I agree that it's best to backup both before and after - unfortunately, as a 24/7 facility, scheduling down time is akin to pulling teeth from a disgruntled warthog. So when I do get some down time, I run a full system save & then load PTFs.
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