Setting up Small Business Server 2008 on a workstation

10 pts.
Tags:
Client Access
Login
Notebook computers
SBS 2008
Workstations
I know when setting up Small Business Server 2008 on a workstation, you simply go to an internal web address that downloads the client software to the machine that is used to verify the credentials and to log onto the server. However, my question is when doing this, does this block any non-server user of the computer. For example, could somebody use the workstation as a regular computer without logging into the server? The reason I ask is that we just purchased a server with SBS 2008 as well as 2 desktop computers to be used as workstations, and a notebook computer. One of the employees wants to use the notebook in place of a normal desktop computer as his workstation. If I was to download the software for him to login to the server, would that keep him from using the notebook computer normally when out of the office? Would he still be able to use the notebook as a regular laptop without providing login credentials for the server? If so, how?

Software/Hardware used:
SBS 2008, Windows 7

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Hi

You don’t <i>have</i> to use the connect computer wizard, you can simply put the workstation on the domain – but what the wizard can do is import a local user profile to the domain user and set a few permissions for you; like giving the user remote access permissions and linking that workstation as their default machine.

Anyhow, to answer your question: No this will not block the computer/laptop from being used outside of the domain and yes he would still be able to use the laptop without providing domain credentials. He would log on to the laptop as a local user, which you would need to setup on the laptop.

In Windows when you log on to a domain, it actually caches the domain credentials used to log in. So your user could in fact log in using his work account, even when at home, and if you are not using roaming profiles he will have all the same settings as he does when logged in to the domain. Obviously server shares etc. wouldn’t be available unless you set up a VPN.

Discuss This Question: 4  Replies

 
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  • TomLiotta
    I have no experience with SBS, so I'm asking only to see if the question might have some other aspects... ...would that keep him from using the notebook computer normally when out of the office? Would he still be able to use the notebook as a regular laptop without providing login credentials for the server? Should that be taken to mean that the laptop would be used in one way or the other, but that the two different uses won't be concurrent? I'm wondering if something like a dual-boot scenario might fit. Tom
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  • Dwiebesick
    Yes if done properly, the notebook user will be able to logon using domain cached credentials. http://support.microsoft.com/kb/913485 After a successful domain logon, a form of the logon information is cached. Later, a user can log on to the computer by using the domain account, even if the domain controller that authenticated the user is unavailable. Because the user has already been authenticated, Windows uses the cached credentials to log the user on locally. For example, suppose a mobile user uses a domain account to log on to a laptop that is joined to a domain. Then, the user takes the laptop to a location where the domain is unavailable. In this scenario, Windows uses the cached credentials from the last logon to log the user on locally and to allocate access to local computer resources. The key will be to join the notebook to your domain, assign the individual and have them logon. Once they logon using domain credentials, they can logon when not in your office. I recommend that you find a 'consultant' or business that is Microsoft certified as a Small Business Specialists as they will be able to properly assist in setting up your SBS enviroment.
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  • TheITProjectBlog
    Hi, Apart from caching your profile there are two things you need to be aware of: 1. You need to ensure that the Group Policy for cached logins is set the maximum. I believe this is 50 logons. After that, the user will need to visit the office and logon to the network. This is a security messure 2. You can always enable offline files, again through group policy so that the user can access shares whilst he is away from the office. Thanks Raj Web Designer Office Space Chennai Contributor to Microsoft Office at The IT Project Blog
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  • Stevesz
    Actually, by selecting the domain, the user can log-in to the local machine only, whether he is in the office or not. Just click on the down arrow on the domain line (an optional display) and choose the local machine. The user would probably use a different log-in that way, not the domain log-in. Depending on the workgroup designation of the computer, he may or may not be able to see the server and log-in to that to access shared objects. I have a laptop joined to my SBS 2008 domain at home. When I am away, I do not bother to log-in to the local machine, but still use my domain credentials. I have heard that the cached credentials will only last so long, but I have not logged my laptop into the domain for periods over a month, while using it outside the home on a relatively frequent basis.
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