Routing between two subnets & between two networks

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DNS
H.323
Hewlett-Packard
Networking
Nortel
Routers
SIP
Subnets
1. I have two separate networks 192.168.0.0 and 192.168.1.0, they are physical connected by CAT5 cable. What should I configure and where to configure so that the host of each network can connect to another host in other network? 2. I have two subnets (after subnetting a class B Network), they are physical connected by CAT5 Cable. What should I configure and where so that host of each network can connect to other host in other network?
ASKED: January 10, 2007  4:17 AM
UPDATED: April 18, 2013  5:36 PM

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Considering that subnets are smaller networks, remember that we use routers to achieve communications between two networks. This example of my home network is no exception to this rule.

We need a router which will route packets from one network to the other. Let’s have a look at one way we can solve this problem:

Using a server with two network cards
or a new Server which has at least two network cards installed. By connecting each network card to one of our networks and configuring the network cards so that each one belongs to one subnet/network we can route packets between them: The second network card has been installed and it’s been assigned an IP address that falls within our network 1 range and therefore can communicate with my workstation. On the other hand server now acts as a gateway for network 1, so my workstation is reconfigured to use it as its gateway. Any packets from network 1 to network 2 or the Internet will pass through the server

Another solution is to use a router which you should use only if you have a large network.

Discuss This Question: 6  Replies

 
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  • Dcnettech
    If you have created the networks using vlans on a switch you may also be able to create a static route to the other networks. Please provide more information on the equipment at your disposal.
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  • Acandler
    It depends on the devices used to interconnect the networks. If you are connecting router-to-router then you can use a compatible routing protocol like RIP, IGRP, OSPF or the like. If you are using layer 3 switches then you can set up VLANs and a trunk link between the switches. Please respond and give as much detail as you can on the devices.
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  • Astronomer
    Since you say you have two IP nets connected by a CAT5 cable, I assume you are running both logical networks on the same "wire". If this is true, you either have to add a router as described in other responses or pull the subnet mask out on all systems so the devices can see both "nets" as a single net, without having to use a router. You didn't say why you are running two networks. The normal reasons are partitioning for security or to limit broadcast traffic. If either if these is true, then you should separate these nets with a router or layer3 switch. Assuming you add a router to keep these nets apart: Configure the router to have valid addresses and masks on both nets using the appropriate interfaces. Configure each host to have a proper subnet mask for its network. Configure each host to use the router IP on its network as its default gateway. Any router with interfaces on two or more subnets doesn't need a routing protocol to allow communication between these subnets. It already knows how to forward packets to any network it is directly connected to. On the other hand, if you want to reach the internet or a network behind another router, you will have to configure static or dynamic routing. Based on your description, this isn't needed. Is this sufficient information? rt
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  • Spadasoe
    Looks to me like homework..... 1. Router 2. Nothing required
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  • Irreverant
    Using a server with two network cards or a new Server which has at least two network cards installed. By connecting each network card to one of our networks and configuring the network cards so that each one belongs to one subnet/network we can route packets between them: The second network card has been installed and it's been assigned an IP address that falls within our network 1 range and therefore can communicate with my workstation. On the other hand server now acts as a gateway for network 1, so my workstation is reconfigured to use it as its gateway. Any packets from network 1 to network 2 or the Internet will pass through the server Another solution is to use a router which you should use only if you have a large network.
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  • Irreverant
    Sorry cut off my previous post. Since their on the same subnet mask, you could use a layer switch as previously stated. If you don't have the budget for a nice switch, maybe you can use a small layer 2 switch like a linksys mini 5 port switch and two linksys routers with each configured as the dhcp server for your networks and configure a static route so that any request made on one network will have it's packets transmitted to the second network through that route. We can get into summary routes later.
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