Reclaim System Storage

pts.
Tags:
i5
IBM iSeries
OS/400
Performance/Tuning
I was considering doing a reclaim system storage this weekend, but was just curiuos if anyone wanted to share how long their's took to run in the past. We have a 820 model with about 78% of 510GB being used. it has 4GB of memory and processor speed is rated at 2350CP. I was planning on 12 hours to be enough time, but I have never attempted. This box has been in production for about 3 years. All of the docs that I have looked at say there is no way to estimate time it will take, so thats's why I am trying to get some insight. Thank You.

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You can find out exactly how long it took the last time it ran on your system. type in – dspdtaara qrclstg – from a command line. you should see something like:

1050611 160328
1050611 170237
V4R4M0 SXXXXXXX 1XXXXXX

First line is the start time, second line is the stop time, third line is release & serial number of the system.

This system is at 79%

Hope that helps

That is only if it has been run before. If it has never been run then it will also tell you and there is no way of telling. I suggest anytime you move to new hardware, plan once the system is loaded, to run the RCLSTG command so going forward you know how long it may take on the new hardware.

Lovemyi

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  • Ritakrop
    On a system with 5,3 Tb diskspace of which is 74% used and mem 28 Mb it took 2 hours 45 minutes; but we do a rclstg every month and the more often you do it, the lesser time it takes it also depends on damaged objects on the system and how many of them hope this helps
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  • DeadMeatinLA
    Also if you do a "PRTDSKINF *SYS" you will get a short report that includes a few items on page 3 near the bottom that indicate percentages of disk involved with the reclaim storage process... QRPL lib and QRCL lib and another Reclain storage line for items not in libraries. It is pretty subjective... but if all those number are 0% or very close... running a reclaim won't buy you much... but it won't take very long either. If you haven't run a RTVDSKINF recently thse numbers won't be reflective of the current condition.
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  • TomLiotta
    I'm not sure anyone outside of IBM would be comfortable predicting a full RCLSTG run-time. (And I'd expect an IBMer to be nervous about it.) Note that there are two RCLSTG types -- full and *DBXREF. AFAIK, there is no point in running a full RCLSTG unless you have reason to believe it will actually reclaim something. You could get an indication that RCLSTG was needed by the RTVDSKINF/PRTDSKINF commands previously mentioned. If the printout doesn't show that anything is eligible, then don't run a full RCLSTG, as a rule of thumb. You would commonly check the disk info after significant system failures such as crashes from power loss. I'm not sure if reports of damaged objects have any direct relationship to RCLSTG, but I would definitely start checking the disk info reports if a cluster of damaged objects showed up. Whatever caused one could easily cause the other. Note that most objects eligible for RCLSTG are temporary objects that may have been in QTEMP or elsewhere during a crash. RCLSTG simply places entries to those objects into library QRCL so that you can delete them and thereby "reclaim that storage". OTOH, RCLSTG *DBXREF is both far less resource intensive and takes much less time. I don't recall _ever_ seeing one run over 30 mins. This option rebuilds the system database catalog. A number of relatively trivial problems can cause pieces to get a little out of synch. Most of those result in PTFs for DB2, but I think it's possible that problems can be caused by actions of programmers and perhaps operators, e.g., direct access to files such as QADBIFLD. I wouldn't be concerned about running RCLSTG *DBXREF nightly if I had a nightly procedure that went to restricted state, though it would likely be waste of time. Overall, the waste of time may be your biggest concern. Why run RCLSTG if it won't accomplish anything? That's like applying cume packages every six months and running SAVSYS weekly; you get no value in return.
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  • Addisonm
    A downtime of 4-6 hours should be enough.
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  • RSP
    If your ISeries happens to be a Domino Lotus Notes server with most of the data in the IFS, it will not take any time at all (less than 30 minutes).
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  • TomLiotta
    The QRCLSTG data area can tell how long the last RCLSTG took. It has no necessary relationship to how long the next one will take. It might have no relevance to your current system at all. On one of my systems (a model 170) it says the last RCLSTG was run in 1997, Sept. 24th. The data area says the system name was RCHASP3D and serial number was 10119BD. The current serial number is 102YMYM. AFAIK, RCLSTG has never been run, but I did buy the system direct from IBM, so maybe it was renamed and given a different serial number. On my second system, the data area is blank. Most recent systems should never need a RCLSTG, so I'd expect blanks in the data area. I've averaged around six systems in my control every day for the last ten years. None of them ever needed RCLSTG. The first question is "Why are you thinking about RCLSTG?" If you've gone through significant system failures due to immediate power loss or similar processing disasters, RCLSTG should have been done as soon as it possibly could be scheduled. If significant time has passed since any need for RCLSTG arose, then it's almost certainly not worth running one. There isn't enough space to reclaim to pay back the time it'll take. There's nothing you can recover that you need. The system isn't going to run any better. So... why? Tom
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