RDP connection is not the correct computer

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Active Directory
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DHCP
DNS
Microsoft Windows
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Thanks in advance for any help! Im in a mixed 20002003 domain. When I RDP by name into several machines (all XP machines) in my building it is not the PC that I think it is. I check the actual PC name and its not the one I used to RDP into it, therefore not the machine I wantthink im looking at. Im leaning towards DNS issues. Has anybody seen this at all?

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99.9999% certain it is a DNS issue. I’d wager your internal DNS servers are enabled for dynamic updates and that the scavenging of outdated records is misconfigured.

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  • Kellarm
    Ill have to agree...i can RDP using the IP just fine. How do I go about troubleshooting the scaveging records? Thanks Again
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  • Texaganian
    You don't mention whether your DNS servers are 2000 or 2003 but I don't recall any substantive differences between the two in the areas of aging and scavenging records. I know in 2K aging and scavenging was NOT enabled by default. I can't recall whether this is still so in 2003 but I think it probably is. Enabling it at the server level is simple. Perhaps too simple. You _really_ need to understand the aging and scavenging algorithms before you turn it on and configure it or you may end up doing more harm than good. I'd recommend going to Microsoft's own papers on how to configure it. One good one can be found at http://www.microsoft.com/technet/prodtechnol/windowsserver2003/library/Operations/20fbbd82-0cea-4a74-9634-fdd993f4c4f4.mspx (that url is really gross and may be chopped up by formatting). If your DNS server is 2003 the help function has, I think, pretty good information. Don't recall if the 2000 release had as good stuff in help. Bottom line is make sure you understand the inter-relationship of the no-refresh interval, the refresh interval and the scavenge interval. You also need to research whether enabling aging and scavenging at the server level will automatically enable it for pre-existing zones or whether you need to enable them explicitly. And look at whether pre-exiting DNS records will be aged and scavenged. I believe they will not unless you intervene manually.
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  • Snapper70
    How do your clients get their IP addresses? Do you have a really short DHCP least? If so, then you may have users that leave for the weekend, lease expires, and another PC picks up their lease on Monday morning. If you have a fairly static group of PC's and a large enough DHCP pool, extend the lease to 5-10 days. If you have a large number of "itinerant" PC's though, you may find yourself running out of IP addresses!
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  • Kellarm
    Our clients are set up for DHCP with a six day lease. When I run a nslookup an a machine that I can get to using RDP by its name. I receive the following...Shouldnt nslookup resolve it back to the PC's name? The 150.1.73 and 99.15 are DNS servers C:>nslookup jackccscr1ra *** Can't find server name for address 160.150.1.73: Non-existent domain Server: ns21.xxxxxxx.xxxxx.xxxx Address: 160.150.99.15 *** ns21.xxxxx.xxxx.xxx can't find jackccscr1ra: Non-existent domain C:>
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  • Texaganian
    The major difference between using nslookup (or dig) and using the OS resolver is that dig & nslookup _always_ perform a query of the server while the resolver will use cached entries if available. So, issue a "ipconfig /flushdns" on the client you are using to initiate the RDP session, then try the session by name again and see what happens.
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  • Kellarm
    I tried the ipconifg /flushdns with no success. I have no idea what is going on. Its in a lab with about 30 machines that was recently ghosted. I can connect to some by name and not others.
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  • Gutzy63
    Do you have a single DNS server or multiple? Are you using DHCP? Is your DNS setup for reverse lookup? It sound like machines are renewing IPS but not registering properly in DNS table. Therefore when you RDP by name it finds another machine by the IP held for that name, but since has changed.
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  • Sonyfreek
    Since it's in a lab, simply delete all entries from both the foeward and reverse lookup dns tables and do the ipconfig /registerdns on all of the clients. If the IP Addresses are registered properly, then the problem is most likely the scavenging. If they do not work properly, then your DHCP server is setup wrong when it tries to register the addresses with DNS or the DNS server is not accepting them. SF
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  • PhilReed
    "Its in a lab with about 30 machines that was recently ghosted" - if these are all taken from one image are you sure that you have changed the host/computer name on each machine to something unique and then rebooted or allowed the DHCP to renew ? Check for duplicate names in DNS.
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