RCVJRNE

105 pts.
Tags:
AS/400 journaling
Journaling
RCVJRNE
we are using RCVJRNE with *TYPE2 for comparing the UB and UP entries to report the changed fields. We are using sequence number to match the the UB and UP entries. Now we are facing a problem Journal sequance number for entry Crossed length of 10 and we are getting journal entry number as  "-1" and unable to match the records. Is there any way to over come this. We cannot use *TYPE5 as is gives limited data. Any help is appreciated.

Software/Hardware used:
AS/400 - Journaling

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  • TomLiotta
    Now we are facing a problem Journal sequance number for entry Crossed length of 10 and we are getting journal entry number as "-1" and unable to match the records. Is there any way to over come this. Yes. Overcome it by not requesting *TYPE2. Request ENTFMT(*JRNENTFMT) instead. Use the RJNE0100 or RJNE0200 for large sequence numbers (or system sequence numbers if you prefer). We cannot use *TYPE5 as is gives limited data. *TYPE5 isn't a valid type for RCVJRNE. Regardless, I'm not sure what you mean by "limited data" since it gives everything *TYPE2 gives and much more. It also gives the opportunity for the far larger sequence numbers, essentially 20 digits instead of 10 digits. Tom
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  • rajsubhyd
    Thank you Tom for the response. Regarding: We cannot use *TYPE5 as is gives limited data. I was bit confused with DSPJRN and RCVJRNE so mentioned out here. For DSPJRN when we take the output to file for *TYPE5 and use the default values for other parameters it gives the File data in a field of length 100 only. So we get only first 100 characters of the file. Any way as you said it is not valid option for the RCVJRNE. Thank you for the help.
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  • TomLiotta
    ...when we take the output to file for *TYPE5 and use the default values... Don't use default values. If you have a file that 300-byte records, then specify ENTDTALEN(300) or possibly ENTDTALEN(*CALC). For output from a database journal, I usually create my own output file format and use a copy of it to dump entries into. I use all of the journal header fields at the beginning of my custom format, and then I replace the single journal ESD field with all of fields from my database file. That way, after entries are dumped into it, all of my database fields are broken out and separately defined. I would start by duplicating QADSPJR5 and running DSPJRN OUTFILFMT( *TYPE5 ) ENTDTALEN(*CALC) into it to get the entries. Then I do an image copy of that file into my custom format file. An image-copy is done with CPYF FMTOPT( *NOCHK ). Since I use ENTDTALEN(*CALC), the DSPJRN command will calculate what the largest row should be and that's how much data I should get. Tom
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