Question about Domino databases and disk space.

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Lotus Domino
I just have a quick question about user databases and log files. Our Domino server is running out of disk space and i notice many users have huge mail files and some of the logs are really big as well like the domlog.nsf, I am just wondering, is there a way that these users can store more data on to their local hard drives and not on the server? And what is the best method to shrink the log files? We are on Lotus 6.5, please if anyone knows it would be apprecited. Thanks.
ASKED: October 6, 2004  2:15 PM
UPDATED: October 21, 2004  12:59 PM

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sorry for this short answer – archive !!!!
How? Read the admin and client doku

Volker

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  • BruceU
    I agree - For clients, set up local archiving for their mail files. If you haven't already done so, you might want to set quotas to a lower value after archiving has been accomplished. As far as DOMLOG.NSF is concerned, I believe that is the web log. It's disabled by default, but obviously it is enabled on your server. Not sure how to keep it cleaned up and at a lower total filesize, but please look in admin help index. Type 'DOMLOG' and it will take you right to the section you need: Quote: To set up the Domino Web server log, you must enable logging (by default, logging is disabled). You can restrict the information logged to the Domino Web server log to analyze log file results. Some information may increase the size of the log file without providing meaningful information -- requests for graphics or icons, for example, so you may want to exclude that type of information from the log. Domino creates the Web server log database when the HTTP task starts after you enable logging to DOMLOG.NSF. ENDQUOTE Hope this helps...
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  • Natethegreat
    Archiving works but it doesn't remove anything that is archived, an i have it archive and remove the items it archives off of the server to free up space?
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  • ShirleyOu
    You can setup a Policy that enforces them to do local Archiving. Once archiving has been set, set a quota on their mail files to prevent their mail files from growing too large.
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  • Lyteroptes
    I'm not so sure about archiving - especially local which in all probability isn't backed up. If your users have material in their mail file that is important to the company then it ought not to be in their mail file but somewhere accessible to appropriate others and indexed. If it's only important to them then they should take it home. Archiving, especially local is an easy answer (OK, it's not *that* easy) but is only an extension of the problem. Domlog is easy to deal with as it has an agent for clearing out old stuff but if you are not using it for anything stop the logging and save the server some effort. You can also make the server log less - ie. miss out all the images. What other logs, other than log.nsf, do you see?
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  • Bridgeman
    Archiving onto the local disk will reduce the mail size on the server. Another consideration is that if you have soft deletions set on the mail file when a user deletes a message this just transfers it to the trash and does not remove it from the mail file. You will need to get your users to clear out the trash periodically. Another consideration is that do you have compact running on your server as you will not see any return of the diskspace until this is run.
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  • MatNewman
    Nate, 1. Logging. Is your server set to use circular logging? 2. Dom Log. Do you ever run reports off this application? 3. Logging. Is your server set to log to DB's or text? 4. Compact. Have you ever run this server task? Your answers to these questions will assist in resolving your issues. One of your main considerations with respect to server disk space is not whether your users have too much mail, but whether you are utilising your disk space efficiently. There are down sides to local archiving of user's mail, and you should consider all of your options before implementing any solution that reduces your ability to back up what users may consider essential data. Try a server compact ("load Compact") to see how much disk space is actually under utilised, before proceeding. HTH, Mat.
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  • RodHogeland
    We archive to CD's and give them to the respective owner thereby elimating the worry of lost of local C drives or simply transfering the storage problem from one server to another.
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  • Natethegreat
    I did disable the web logging because we do not use it, but how the heck do i shrink the size of the domlog.nsf, no matter how many times i compact it or try to delete it, it stays the same. Same with user databases, we have one guy who has a database that is about 1.6gb, i deleted a ton of stuff from his client, and removed it from the trash and ran a compact on his database, but for some reason the database on the server remains the exact same size! I just don't understand why, is there something i am missing here?
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