Problems attaching to network-2

pts.
Tags:
DataCenter
DHCP
Networking
We are in a small office for a large company and have been having problems ever since they did an IP re-addressing about a month ago. If you have to go to another office (or even home networks)with your laptop, login to that network, and then come back to the office, you can never get a good IP address. In the event viewer, event id's 1003 then 1007 (DHCP errors - in essence, it can't reach the DHCP server.)The exact 1003 error is : Your computer was not able to renew its address from the network (from the DHCP Server) for the Network Card with network address *********. The following error occurred: The semaphore timeout period has expired. . Your computer will continue to try and obtain an address on its own from the network address (DHCP) server. Then it auto-configures an IP address. (error 1007) Sometimes if you do an ipconfig release/renew, it will grab an IP, but sometimes you have to do another cold boot, but then it connects fine. The error occurs in both MS XP and Win2k. Is there anything we can do on our end to alleviate this problem, or does Corporate have to adjust something on their end?

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I just love going out on a limb! In this case I have no idea what the problem might be, but these are the most fun to try out.

Bring up a command prompt on one of the machines and do an IPCONFIG /all and see what the DHCP server address and Lease Expiration is, and compare those values against expectations.

If you can, try to get a sniffer capture of the attempt as well.

My guess would be that during the IP renumber, some details got skipped, but you’re going to have to provide evidence of this to get the IT department to acknowledge.

It does sound like the client is not getting a DHCP response from the server, or at least some part of the DORA (Discover/Offer/Request/Acknowledgement) process is not getting to either the server or the client. It is possible that the switches have not been properly configured as a “IP Helper” (in cisco terms) to forward the DHCP requests to the server. This is of course assuming there were new switches installed and that the switches (or some of them) were layer 3 switches.

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  • Jaysea
    You could try adding the DHCP server addresss to the LMHost file.
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  • K12Support
    First look at your DNS server that your workstation is pointing to, check that the DHCP server record is correct. Also clear the ARP table in your network switches by turning them off, then back on.
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  • Technoob
    The DHCP leases are set to expire in 7 days. Also, they "moved" the DHCP server from the local server to a server that resides about 200 miles away. I will add the address to the LMHOST file and see if I can get permission to do the sniffer trace. Thanks for the suggestions!
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  • Khilving
    I would be careful about trying a local fix within each PC based on the symptom. DHCP settings on each client appear to work everywhere but your office. I suspect the problem is with the network settings. You are using a DHCP relay function, and this appears to have been misconfigured during the IP addressing change. Have the network engineers reveiw the DHCP configurations on each router/switch between your office LAN and the DHCP server first, and if these are correct then they should be looking at the overall routing settings.
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  • KevinE
    Make sure you flush the dns cache too. ipconfig /flushdns when doing your ipconfig /renew and release. I use a batch file that i saved on my desktop to automate this process. Hope this helps. Kevin
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  • Jpagel
    my question to you is this 1. what kind of connection is this? Wired, Wireless?? Is it on EVERY computer you have in the office or just in one spot? I am wondering if there is a cabling issue in just the spot that you are hooking it up...sounds simple and retarded but the fact that you can sometimes connect and other times cant makes me wonder about that....thanx josh
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  • Sonyfreek
    Since it's a large company, I'm going to guess that they have more than one DHCP server. Make sure to check the ip helper-address setting on the VLANs/routers to ensure that they are set to the correct IP Addresses of the DHCP servers and that the DHCP servers have the correct default routes configured. Sonyfreek
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  • TedRizzi
    DHCP is not routeable make sure the dhcp server is on the same network segment as the workstations. if not you will need to set up a dhcp relay server on each segment.
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  • Technoob
    It is a wired network - but only about 5% of the people are experiencing the problem. I don't know if it is a relay problem, but Corp is moving the DHCP sevice back to the local server. Thanks for the help!
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  • Technoob
    Well, moving DHCP back to the local server seemed to do the trick.
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  • Stevesz
    I know that the problem has been resollved, but just to throw this in, fromthe errors you mentioned, it was a connectivity problem with the DHCP server. Since th eproblem only seems to have affected some of the machines, they were all probably going through the same hub or switch, and, plus the travel over the link (whether it be an Internet link or a leased line--probably the former) allowed just enough time for the service to fail. It is really trivial to have a piece of equuiptment serve as a DHCP server, in addition to its other functions, as the service does not put any load, to speak of, on the equipment. Fortunately, in your case, The powers that be saw fit to over rule the powers that wanna be, and had teh DHCP server placed back locally for you. Still, the network connectivity should still be checked from those machines that suffered the problem, and have that issue resolved before data is lost due to a poor connection. Steve//
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