Network Topology Help

11330 pts.
Tags:
Network design
Network security
Network Topology
Networking
Star topology
STP
Switches
Topology
WAP
Wireless networks
wiring
Currently, I am in the process of reqiring our entire network. Previously, this organization has had the 7th floor switches pour into the 6th, the 6th into thr 5th, and so on and so forth until they got to the main backbone and into the server room. I am converting this into a star topology, giving each floor, each switch, a GB link to the core. Although this is not what I am asking about directly, I do have a related question: We currently have both hardwire and wireless network. I am thinking I may want to install another set of switches in closet. These new switches will be reserved for access points alone. Each switch will then go directly to directly to a firewall located just outside of our core, and will then go into the core. One of the main reaosns I want to do this is because of several wireless network cameras we have. One of them, in particular, is in an elevator, and althoug performance is decent mostly, at times the quality and frame rate drops as it searches for new access points. I believe that getting these switches just for the WAP will allow me to change the STP on each switch and improve wireless performance without disrupting the hardwired network. Any thoughts, suggestions, ideas?

Answer Wiki

Thanks. We'll let you know when a new response is added.

If you are using a Layer 2 switch you can assign a new VLAN to the wireless access points and dedicate the ports for the specific access point WLAN MAC address for security.

When you assign the Access Points to the SAME VLAN you can reduce broadcasts and increase bandwidth along with adding some filter security as well (Depending on the switch capabilities).

I recommend purchasing good Cisco switches, create specific VLAN for WLAN and add filtering for security. Extra hardware will accomplish the same thing but is will cost more and not be as versatile.

Each Access Point will need a non-overlap channel, Same SSID and same VLAN. You may want to look at Cisco SWAN as well.

Hope this is helpful.

Discuss This Question: 9  Replies

 
There was an error processing your information. Please try again later.
Thanks. We'll let you know when a new response is added.
Send me notifications when members answer or reply to this question.

REGISTER or login:

Forgot Password?
By submitting you agree to receive email from TechTarget and its partners. If you reside outside of the United States, you consent to having your personal data transferred to and processed in the United States. Privacy
  • Schmidtw
    I like the VLAN idea (especially since it means less wiring for me). Since I did not implement the system we currently have, I am not sure whether these switches are Layer 2. I am also not that familiar with VLAN. I'll have to read up on this.
    11,330 pointsBadges:
    report
  • Jaideep Khanduja
    I think you have besides this synchronization of all switches is also very important, just take care that your backbone is faster than the out of core switches, and to have a high frame relay at all times the new switches that you want to use exclusively for Wireless access should also be high end.
    9,100 pointsBadges:
    report
  • Labnuke99
    VLAN's are at their simplest just a separate subnet. Say if you use 192.168.x.x/16 as your subnet mask, you would move to something like 192.168.x.x/24 as the new subnet mask. Routing becomes very important when VLANs are implemented. Access points are still a shared medium (radio spectrum). So, unless you implement something like a Xirrus AP, then the clients are contending for the 100Mbps or 1000Gbps uplink between the AP and the switch. In the US, you should use channels 1,6 & 11 to prevent channel overlaps.
    32,960 pointsBadges:
    report
  • Schmidtw
    I am skeptical about doing a VLAN, and I would also prefer to skip buying a new set of switches for the APs and running a ton of new wire. Are there any scripts I can write to modify the behavior of a single port or a few ports on each switch to change or disable the STP function?
    11,330 pointsBadges:
    report
  • Labnuke99
    What leads you to believe that STP will create problems? It is there to prevent network looping problems. Network loops can take the entire network down.
    32,960 pointsBadges:
    report
  • Snapper70
    You can run PVST (per-vlan-spanning-tree) if you want (and specify where you don't want to run spanning tree); but are you sure you won't come across looping on any trunk ports either?
    920 pointsBadges:
    report
  • Schmidtw
    I'm not familiar with the port interactions if I am to disable STP on a single port. Truthfully, I am not really aware of all of the functions of STP, but I heard it can disrupt wireless signals for devices such as cameras, that is why I am investigating it.
    11,330 pointsBadges:
    report
  • Labnuke99
    Check out this wikipedia article on spanning tree protocol.
    32,960 pointsBadges:
    report
  • Schmidtw
    Thanks for the article. I'll read up on this.
    11,330 pointsBadges:
    report

Forgot Password

No problem! Submit your e-mail address below. We'll send you an e-mail containing your password.

Your password has been sent to:

To follow this tag...

There was an error processing your information. Please try again later.

REGISTER or login:

Forgot Password?
By submitting you agree to receive email from TechTarget and its partners. If you reside outside of the United States, you consent to having your personal data transferred to and processed in the United States. Privacy

Thanks! We'll email you when relevant content is added and updated.

Following