Network CAT5 cable issue…

15 pts.
Tags:
CAT 5
Network
Network connectivity
I had my new house pre-wired with CAT5. I have been running my home pc wireless to date, but now the adapter has pooped out. I bought push down connectors and wired them according to the "A" standard (both ends the same), and connected it to the router. My pc tells me there is limited connectivity, and in the status, it shows bytes sent but none received. When i just connect it with a store-bought cable, it works great! Despite changing the connectors several times and moving the cat5 away from potential interference where i could, i cannot get it to function normal. Any ideas?? thanks...

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If connecting with store bought patch cables works, and the ones you made doesn’t then the problem is with the cables you made. One or more of the pins aren’t making contact correctly. The only solution to fix the cables is to cut off the ends and try again.

Making cables is tough. There’s a reason that most people don’t bother trying it them selves.
I would look at the cables again, and check them using a digital multimeter for connectivitiy.

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  • BlankReg
    Try re-crimping the connectors onto the cable. If that doesn't work, then like Mrdenny said, you need to cut them off and try again. However I disagree with him about how easy it is, with a little practise, and the correct crimping tool, you will be consistantly making good cables. Also the usual standard is ETA/TIA 568B, which has the orange pair on the left.
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  • Denny Cherry
    I may just be incredibly bad at it. When ever I've tried making cables I have a very high failure rate. At this point I've decided that it's just cheaper and easier for me to buy pre-made cables. Not punching down wall jacks, that's a piece of cake. Like I said though, could just be me.
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  • Teicneoir
    I agree with BlankReg that the most common problem with cables that do not work is the the were not crimped correctly. Many times, just re-crimping them corrects the problem. Another problem is one or more of the wires are not pushed all the way up into the head. To help you make sure you put the wires are in the correct order, cut the head off of a cable that does work, leaving about a inch of the cable. Straighten out the wires so that you can easily see how they are lined up. Making your own cables isn't hard if you take your time. You will save money, have cables that are the correct length, and have a nicer finished project.
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  • Ddoig
    Thank you very much, i appreciate your responses and suggestions...I would gladly use pre made cables, but my problem is that the wire is already in the walls! Is there a connector that's better than the others? I've tried each end 6 or 7 times! thanks....D
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  • Teicneoir
    If you have changed the heads 6 or 7 times, I don't think it is the heads. You need to check the wires in the wall. Make sure that the wires are punched down correctly in the wall jacks. Use a tester to make sure that the signal will go through.
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  • Denny Cherry
    Cables in the walls are different from the patch cables. Totally different process in making them. I assume that you made the cables from the computer to the wall. If you've changed the connecters that many times you've either got a break in the cable, or the ends aren't making a solid connection with the wall jack. I agree with Teicneoir that a cable tester is what's needed here.
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