Need help sending email with attached document directly from iSeries

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AS/400
Microsoft Exchange
Alan has an existing application that uses the SNDDST command to send an e-mail with a document attached. He's been asked to modify the document name to include more information. The problem is, the document parameter allows only 12 characters in the document name. Is there a way to use a longer document name with the SNDDST command? The document is a .TXT file that can be located anywhere in the IFS. -- Michelle Davidson, editor, Search400.com

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Hi!!

Issue a command called CHGPOPA and change the Message split size to *NOMAX. This will resolve your problem.

Regards,

Nilesh Roy.

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Alan:

Don’t use SNDDST if you’re not sending SNA distributions, which is what the command does. Just because it can route some messages across the gateway to the SMTP server doesn’t mean it can route everything across.

If you want to use the SMTP server, then use the facilities that are intended for it. Use SNDDST only for what it’s supposed to be used for.

Tom

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  • JPLamontre
    I have try to but SNDDST is not able to work with IFS file (if anyone know how, I am interrested) I have try MIMEMAIL, it is powerfull : able to send any file (IFS is it's main source), any number of file, core tool is in RPG, and has a web interface. But ... my 400 has QCCSID(*HEXA), and MIMEMAIL is build to work with correct job ccsid. Look at it, it can be a pretty solution to your problem.
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  • TomLiotta
    @JPLamontre: Why would anyone use QCCSID 65535 (*HEX)? By definition, you're telling your system NOT to perform character translations. Now, when you want translations for functions such as for MIME, it follows your instructions and doesn't do it. Change QCCSID to a reasonable value. Tom
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  • Teandy
    Do yourself a HUGE favor and look at using one of the free or commercial software packages email packages for the i5. MMAIL and RPGMAIL are two of the free ones. I have used MMAIL for a long time but recently went to Brad Stone's MAILTOOL and MAILTOOL Plus products. Definitely one of the best decisions I ever made.
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  • pdraebel
    CCSID 65535 will prevent automatic character conversion when sending files between systems. If you allow automatic conversion (sending from system in CCSID x to CCSID y) you could up converting Packed fields (number) and would come up with different numbers on the receiving system as iSeries would convert a file as one long string without taking into account the field definitions in a file. Peter
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  • TomLiotta
    If you allow automatic conversion (sending from system in CCSID x to CCSID y) you could up converting Packed fields (number) and would come up with different numbers on the receiving system as iSeries would convert a file as one long string without taking into account the field definitions in a file. When using SMTP, there should never be embedded "Packed fields". SMTP only allows ASCII 7-bit characters. (See Multipurpose Internet Mail Extensions (MIME) for details.) If "Packed fields" need to be sent, or if conversion simply isn't wanted, then the attachment must be pre-processed to encode as a MIME type before SNDDST or any other SMTP interface is called on the AS/400. After the attachment file is encoded, it must be wrapped in proper MIME headers and then attached appropriately. SMTP is intended as a text file transport. Non-text attachments must be encoded into a form that only contains ASCII text characters. The MIME headers tell the remote e-mail client how to decode the attachment back to original form. This is basic stuff that's mostly been around from the beginning of SMTP. The MIME protocols were invented mostly to help get around the SMTP text limitations. Tom
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