NAS General questions

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NAS
NAS filers
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I have several questions regarding NAS. First is what type of OS is the more reliable on a NAS? what is a NAS Filer? How are group permissions and permissions in general handled?

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First is what type of OS is the more reliable on a NAS?
-> well … it depends … i would rather ask which raid-levels are more reliable :=)
-> Windows-Clusters nowadays seem to be reliable, clustered fileservers in a linux cluster which internally use a cluster file system are also very good, NetApp is doing clustered NAS-services….

what is a NAS Filer?
=> an appliance by Network Appliances which serves File Serving [NAS] purposes; proprietary but widely distributed, they have a specialized file system and OS

How are group permissions and permissions in general handled?

=> depends upon the Network File System Layer used [SMB/CIFS or NFS are the most widely distributed ones]

hope i could help :=)

volker

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  • Dcsys99
    OK, here's my two cents: First is what type of OS is the more reliable on a NAS? Most NAS heads are based on Winders or Linux. I believe the Linux-based NAS devices would be more reliable. They are a stripped down, customized kernel. The NetApp filers use "Data OnTap", which has a regular release cycle and is highly reliable. The Linux based filers are less prone to worms and viruses as well. what is a NAS Filer? As Volker said, a NAS filer is actually the name of the Network Appliance NAS device. Some people use "filer" as a generic term for NAS device. How are group permissions and permissions in general handled? Every NAS that I have seen will integrate with Active Direcory, Novell eDirectory, LDAP, NIS and simple /etc/passwd authentication Hope this answers your questions. Dave
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  • Dcsys99
    OK, here's my two cents: First is what type of OS is the more reliable on a NAS? Most NAS heads are based on Winders or Linux. I believe the Linux-based NAS devices would be more reliable. They are a stripped down, customized kernel. The NetApp filers use "Data OnTap", which has a regular release cycle and is highly reliable. The Linux based filers are less prone to worms and viruses as well. what is a NAS Filer? As Volker said, a NAS filer is actually the name of the Network Appliance NAS device. Some people use "filer" as a generic term for NAS device. How are group permissions and permissions in general handled? Every NAS that I have seen will integrate with Active Direcory, Novell eDirectory, LDAP, NIS and simple /etc/passwd authentication Hope this answers your questions. Dave
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  • KevinJ
    Don't forget Windows Storage Server (WSSr2 )http://www.microsoft.com/windowsserversystem/wss2003/default.mspx What's the nature of the data (I/O tendency, how much?) How many users? Level of availability required, etc. WSS offers features above and beyond just NAS, but your requirements may dictate a higher performing system, redundant processors, additional features, replication, etc. A NetApp filer, as an example, is rock solid in its presentation, easy to manage, even denotes block-level support on the front-end. But in the backend, it's still a filer. Its underlying RAID structure and LUN virtualization strategy may be appropriate for your environment, may not. What else is going on within the storage environment? What about application storage consolidation? If that's also necessary, where are you going with that? You'll need to consider block vs file I/O, can you work it with NAS or will you implement a SAN of some size. What about NAS on SAN to retain a single storage management domain? Consider the total environment...
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