My computer hacked by someone in Afghanistan?

25 pts.
Tags:
Hacking
Security
An AOL person says that my personal computer has been hacked by someone in Afghanistan; how can he tell?

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The first thing you need to think about is why someone would just ring / email / send pigeon to let you know that someone has hacked your machine / Phone / Nintendo DS. There is no gain for them to do this. It is likely that they are trying to sell you somethng that you do not need.

but to be on the safe sinde…
Make sure your Firewall is OK – Windows and Upto date will stop most casual hackers.
Update Operating Systems to stop know bugs.
Scan your machine for Malware
Install AV software to stop further Malware.
Turn your machine off when not in us if you are worried but dont be.

I hope this helps put your mind at ease

Discuss This Question: 5  Replies

 
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  • CharlieBrowne
    I would assume the person cannot actually tell you this.Has this person actually looked through your computer? If NOT, do not continue because this person is just flapping his lips.If so, WHY did he look it over. Tell him to show you the proof. Then come back here and tell us about it. 
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  • carlosdl
    Yep, you should ask him how he can tell
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  • TomLiotta
    Without knowing anything about the person, we can't guess how he could know. If he is part of an AOL Support group and he is working on a customer support question from you, it is possible that he has access to logs that indicate an IP address in Afghanistan. But that by itself is not enough to know that the "hacker" was in Afghanistan. -- Tom
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  • TechyGirl
    The AOL person could access your computer by using the remote assistance program. You would need to log in as the administrator. You can find out if you have been hacked by going into the Windows Start Menu and type cmd into the search box, then press enter to open a command line window, type "net user" without the quotes at the command prompt and press enter. Windows will then list all users that access that computer. You can then detect whether or not an account has been created without your permission. Verify that all accounts in the output of "net user" are legitimate. If additional accounts exist, they are likely to have been created by a hacker. You can examine the dates and times of the last login to determine whether or not logins occur at a normal time. If there is a discrepancy, then a hacker is likely responsible. If the hacker has left a path, then it can be traced back.
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  • TomLiotta
    If the hacker has left a path, then it can be traced back.   It can only be traced as far as you have authority to trace. E.g., if a 'zombie' system was controlled in Afghanistan and a trace leads that far, that's likely the end of any tracing you can do.   Of course, even determining a physical country location doesn't guarantee the location of the system. It only shows where the IP address is registered. A dial-up access is easy enough to throw that off completely.   Tom
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