Move HD with K2000 to new computer

110 pts.
Tags:
Blue Screen of Death
Hard drives
Hardware
Windows 2000 Server
I need to move the hard drives with Win2000 from an older computer to a new computer. When I tried starting the new computer, I got a BSOD with 0x07B inaccessible_boot_disk. The drives were jumpered correctly, the data cable was secure. The BIOS did not recognize either drive. Any idea on how I can get the BIOs to recognize the drives and will that mean that the Win2000 OS will boot?

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this is the 3 ways i think you should follows… check the cmos set-up and change the first boot setup to hard disk…. Or check if the cable you connect to the hard disk was from the IDE 1 socket..ok.
OR put a window 200o server to repair the hard disk.

Even if you can get the BIOS to recognize the drives odds are the Windows 2000 won’t boot. The hardware (motherboard, chipset, etc) will be so different that Windows won’t have any of the drivers installed for the new hardware. A repair might fix the problem, but you may have to reinstall completely.

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  • Dwiebesick
    Before you can go any further with your project, the BIOS must properly detect you hard drives. If possible, use another computer and connect the drives - ONE at a time, to the proper channel and boot into the BIOS. Check to ensure that the drive is detected correctly. Do the same with the other drive. You may have to have the jumpers changed to allow for the BIOS to detect the drive. Some systems and/or BIOS will not work if the drive is jumpered for MASTER and there is no slave. SO ensure you check the hard disk manufacturer’s instructions regarding this. IF both drives are (individually) properly detected, then connect them either to the same channel (I am assuming IDE here) and have them configured as Master/Slave or you can connect them to Primary and Secondary channels as both Master (removing the CD which is usually connected to the secondary channel) and try booting. If you can get to the point of attempting a boot, the previous poster is correct that it is doubtful you would get a successful boot. You have not stated why you need these drives bootable? Are you trying to make a ‘new computer’ by moving the drives over to a new system? OR are you trying to recover data? If this is for data recovery, then I would suggest trying a different method, ONCE you have the BIOS recognize the drives. Check out projects like Bart’s PE or UBCD4WIN etc. IF this is for a ‘new computer’ then be aware that this is not legal. Here is the information from Microsoft regarding this, it references XP and mother boards, but the rules would also apply in your case. There are SO many forums that continue to promote this myth that you can use an OEM version of XP when you change out a system board or on a completely different computer ‘because you own XP”. This is taken from Microsoft’s OEM manufactures partner’s website (Windows live sign in required and must be OEM member) https://oem.microsoft.com/script/contentpage.aspx?PageID=552862&wa=wsignin1.0 Upgrading a Motherboard? An upgrade of the motherboard is considered to result in a "new personal computer" to which Microsoft OEM operating system software cannot be transferred from another computer. If the motherboard is upgraded or replaced, for reasons other than a defect, then a new computer has been created and the license of new operating system software is required. IF the motherboard is replaced because it is defective, you do not need to acquire a new operating system license for the PC. The replacement motherboard must be the same make/model or the same manufacturer’s replacement/equivalent, as defined by that manufacturer’s warranty. The reason for this licensing rule primarily relates to the end-user license agreement (EULA) and the support of the software covered by that EULA. The EULA is a set of usage rights granted to the end user by the PC manufacturer and relates only to rights for that software as installed on that particular PC. The system builder is required to support the software on that individual PC. Understanding that end users, over time, upgrade their PC with different components, Microsoft needed to have one base component "left standing" that would still define that original PC. Since the motherboard contains the CPU and is the "heart and soul" of the PC, when the motherboard is replaced (for reasons other than defect) a new PC is essentially created. The original system builder, therefore, cannot be expected to support this new PC that they did not manufacture.
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  • Pressler2904
    A very good point regarding the legality of moving an OEM license to a different computer, but that may not apply in this case (again, very good advise and thanks for mentioning it... someone needed to). The 0x7B INACCESSIBLE_BOOT_DEVICE stop error indicates that the hard drive does not have the proper chipset or IDE controller (or SCSI controller or SATA controller......) drivers and so the OS cannot see the drive, Your best bet to address this issue is to take your original OS installation disk (you have an installation disk, right???), boot from it, using the "F6" prompt to supply the chipset / IDE controller (or SCSI controller or SATA controller......) drivers if and as needed, and run a repair or an "in place upgrade" of the OS. This should allow you to successfully boot the system. As previously stated, you will most likely need to supply several critical drivers (video, network, storage subsystem, sound (if used), etc...) to enable full OS functionality.
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  • XMac
    Thanks for all the information. We do have an Win2000 install disk (MAR - microsoft authorized refurbisher) and valid code. We just wanted to move the drives to a computer with a faster processor. I did copy over the important files to the computer we wanted to move the hard drives to. Right now, considering all the problems, we are going to have both the servers in the network so some tasks can be done with one and others computers can connect to the faster computer with shared folders in XP. I am not going to give up on moving the drives but I'll have to put it off until a weekend (or two) in August as it is not possible to do much more until then. (we need the server running during the week and my weekends are tied up until then.) It was good to hear from all of you.
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  • Trace
    Connect a newly formatted HD , that is clear of information. Once the system detects it by itself , (no need for jumpers) , make sure you have a previously created "system disk" from the old computer in the floppy drive. Windows will boot to DOS. In DOS note which drive is the CD Rom and put in the Win2000 disk and install the Operating System onto the new HD. Once the new system is stable and restarts to the desktop , shut it down , connect your other hard drives starting with the HD with the Operating System on it. (C:/ ???) . Once you achive restarting with the C:/ drive which contains the old OS , then copy everything from it to the newest HD and confirm their existence. Then format the old HD. Do the same with the 2nd HD and you have your entire system on a HD that is recognized by the system with the new motherboard or processor. The new BIOS does not recognize the old HD's BIOS information files. You could even just install a new HD in the new machine , then run the other 2 HD's as slaves , but delete the OS from the 1 that is the active partition.
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  • Trace
    There is a program called "Ghost" which comes with Epox motherboards that allows you to do almost anything to your system from within an existing Windows application. While XP will not allow that because it will tell you it is not possible while the system is running. Ghost is thorough and quick , it deletes , copies , partitions , formats , everything without any need to do anything but click the right buttons and follow the instructions. It would even allow you to hook up a new HD to your old computer and copy your "other than operating system files" on it " , before you install the operating system on the new HD. Then all you need is the OS , as I said on the new HD , and you won't risk anything until the new system starts normally with all of your files on a fresh Win2000 installation. Activate as required with Microsoft , your license allows you to change system components , in fact if you attempt to boot the old HD's too much and move them back and forth , the program will detect this and refuse to allow you to "log on" , until you re-active Windows through calling Microsoft.
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  • Trace
    Prior to doing anything , if you can get to the BIOS , and you see that the HD's are not detected , you should make sure that the Boot Sequence is as follows : First Boot Device = Floppy 2nd Boot Device = CD ROM 3rd Boot Device = HD enable all floppy seeks and "other" devices When you restart with a new HD (it must be partitioned and formatted) , to accept information to be copied onto it. What will happen is the BIOS will not detect any operating system , but , because of the set Boot Sequence it will look for a Floppy and then a CD. If you boot from floppy or CD your Ramdrive will receive all the necessary files copied to your memory chips (usually D:/) , that is your temporary Ramdrive. It clears each time you shut the computer down , unless otherwise set not to. That is what any "system or boot disk" will do. It copies the floppy and CD Rom files to Ramdrive. (memory in DIMMS) It will tell you which drive is your CD Rom drive as well , like : G: (depends on how many partitions on HD). Once you get to a blinking "-" or C: you simply type ( G: ) then when you see G:/ , you type install or setup or setup.exe. Win2000 setup will begin. At any time if doing this doesn't seem to get the Win2000 CD to run setup , you can view all the files on whatever is in your floppy or CD Rom by typing : dir or dir/w (dir/w will allow you to see better).
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  • Trace
    If installing a newly formatted HD , make sure you don't connect it , and the other 2 HD's together , as the purpose and detection will fail for the new HD to seek the floppy or CD boot disk. The new computer will have to detect the empty formatted HD , then it will go through the boot sequence settings and allow the Ramdrive to be loaded with the floppy and CD Rom files necessary to reach your C: prompt or G: whatever you need , from A: to Z:
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