Module

515 pts.
Tags:
AS/400
RPGLE
hi,

I had a doubt when we should take option 14 and when we  should take option 15 to create a rpgle module.



Software/Hardware used:
As400

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Option ’14’ is for creating a program <b>Create Bound RPG Program (CRTBNDRPG)</b>.
Where as Option ’15’ is for creating a module <b>Create RPG Module (CRTRPGMOD)</b>.

Modules can be bound together as a program using <b>CRTPGM</b>.
Modules can also be bound together as a ‘service program’ using <b>CRTSRVPGM</b>.

Pradeep.

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  • TomLiotta
    Use option 14 to create a program object (*PGM) from a single module that you are compiling. This is kind of a 'one step' compile when you only need to compile one module for your program. Other modules may be bound in if they are already compiled and can be accessed through binding directory entries. Option 14 is a short-cut that essentially does option 15 for you, and then it does the CRTPGM step from the module that it just finished compiling. Use option 15 to compile a module to create a *MODULE object. The compiler always compiles modules (even with option 14). Once a module is compiled, you use the CRTPGM command to run the binding step that creates a program from your module. The CRTPGM command allows you to supply a list of modules and to say which one is the entry module (similar to a "main" module). If you never use more than a single module for your programs, you can almost always just use option 14. If you find that you are often using the CALL instruction to call other programs or if you find that you are using copies (e.g., /COPY or even actual copies) of subroutines in multiple programs, those will be good places to begin thinking about multiple modules. Tom
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  • 22917
    Scenario 1 : Now i am creating a RPGLE program with Main Procedure and Sub Procedure in a Same Program ,say for example, SAMPLE. i have to take here Option 14 and Default activation group as "Yes" ... This Will allow only 14 option and not Option 15...Am i right? Scenario 2 : Now i am creating a RPGLE prog with Main Procedure alone , so here Option 15 and Sub Procedures in as a separate modules , here also Option 15.. Any Mistake Please let me know
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  • TomLiotta
    Scenario 1 : Now i am creating a RPGLE program with Main Procedure and Sub Procedure in a Same Program ,say for example, SAMPLE. i have to take here Option 14 and Default activation group as “Yes” … This Will allow only 14 option and not Option 15…Am i right? The easiest way to do it is with option 14. But you could use option 15 if you wanted to. Then you would also need to run CRTPGM to create the *PGM object with the single module. When you use option 14, it does that for you. Scenario 2 : Now i am creating a RPGLE prog with Main Procedure alone , so here Option 15 and Sub Procedures in as a separate modules , here also Option 15.. Each module must be compiled. Use option 15 for each module. When you are ready to bind the modules together to generate a complete program, run CRTPGM. There is more to learn about those options. If you use binding directories, some things can be different. You can learn about those later. Tom
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