Mapping network drives on clients

470 pts.
Tags:
Network connectivity
Network drives
Network mapping
Network mapping tools
Ok, this is very basic, but I am new to networking. My understanding is that mapping network drives on clients in a particular domain is client dependent. In other words, if I map on my PC connection to drive X, and then later I log in on another PC in the same network, I would have to map the drive on that PC too if I want to access shared drive X.

One of my users told me that when she logs to other PCs with her log in credentials, that she is able to access the drives from those PCs. She pointed to me that her employee was mapped to share drives on his PC, but when he logged in on another PC, he could not access it (I had to map). "How come?" she asked. "When I log in on this PC, I am connected, but when he loggs, he is not.."

Please confirm or not, that access to share drives is client based and not user based (assuming of course that user was given access rights in the first based).

Thank you,

Mickey

 

 



Software/Hardware used:
Windows XP sp.2

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you can make logon script on each user profile and link logon script your server domain controller…

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  • Chippy088
    Shared drives are fairly simple from a single networked PC, until you start wanting to use other PCs and want connection to the same drive, then you do have to map them using roaming profiles. Then it gets more complex. It sounds like your user that can access the same drives from other PCs has a roaming profile, which has permissions to access the external drive(s). You don't say if you have network controls in place, like Active Directory, for example.
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  • mikidc
    Chippy, thank you for a prompt reply, I am not a network admin. in our org. I am a low level tech support and I am trying to understand and answer question by a persistant and bully like user (who happens to be my boss..) We all have same type of profiles and it appears to be roaming one (I read about it, after your response) Well, I am not sure completely. Acc. to Wiki, a roaming profile "allows a user with a computer joined to a Win. Serv. domain to log on any computer on the same network and access their documents.." This is not true for us. If I log in to another computer I can not access documents from my own client since they are on the hard drive. I can connect to share drives from any PC, IF I MAP the access to that drive (right??). Now the rest of the definition is true for use . "..and have a consistent desktop experience, such as applications remembering toolbar positions and preferences, or the desktop appearance staying the same." To answer your question about network controls (??), when I go to my network places I can search Active directory to find users, contacts and groups (not that I am well versed in it, but I found myself). Mickey
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  • TomLiotta
    ...access to share drives is client based and not user based... Yes and no. Consider two basic logon scenarios -- logon through a PC to the network and logon directly to a PC. In that simplified structure, you can have two very different user IDs, even though they're spelled the same. The first case is where you are defined in a server in the network, probably defined in Active Directory. (Depending on the version of Windows...) ...when you start to logon, you might see a window where you type in your user ID and your password. You might also see a button labelled 'Options'. The 'Options' button might allow you to choose between logging onto the network (the domain) or only logging onto the PC itself. Users can be defined for individual PCs. Most common examples are probably PCs in homes. Now, in the simplified structure, a network admin might create a script that is run every time you log onto the domain. The script might run commands that set up mapped drives for you automatically. It won't matter much which PC you log onto, as long as it's a PC that has joined the domain. You can get the drives from the script no matter where you are. But if you take the option to log onto the PC (or if the option isn't available or you don't know that you have the choice), your network script won't run. You'll only get what was set up for you on that single PC. Of course, real networks can be a lot more complex. Various other elements (such as 'roaming profiles') may come into it all. The point is that you can't make the simple distinction between 'client' and 'user'. Is the PC part of a domain, or is it merely in a workgroup, or is it completely stand-alone? Is the logon to the PC or is it sent out to the network? Are there scripts assigned to the user or are other mechanisms activated? Really, the question needs to be answered by whomever handles the setup of your local networking. Lots of details may be involved. Tom
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  • carlosdl
    It certainly sounds like a logon script is creating the mappings.
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  • Subhendu Sen
    Would u like to post ur LogonScript here ! If it is not possible for u right now, requesting u to navigate HERE for clear ur concepts.
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  • tahirliaqat1
    I am network administrator in big organization so i need this mapped drive for each user. We are working in Domain controller environment So i add this script "\server nameshared folder %username%" in user profiles. Before this step i have shared a folder with read and write rights.
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  • mikidc
    Tom, Thank you for extensive explanation. I can see how this can be quite complex. I have done more reading just for my own knowledge. Our log in is to network through our PCs. It is the domain that is chosen in options. Our users do not have the rights to log in to the local machine (only admin. users like me). Our share drives paths are associated through alphabet letter. Once user is granted rights to certain drives, I have to go into "map network drives" and map the letters to drives he is allowed to use. Once that is done, every time user logs in to his PC (to the network actually), he/she will see the drives in the Explorer. The issue is when they go to different PC. I am not sure if scripts are used, because, as I said, sometimes they are visible when I log in to another PC to network, and sometimes they are not, and I have to go to "map network drives" and map them. But anyhow, this appears to be question for our network admin. Thank you all for the input. Mickey
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  • mikidc
    Just a final note, Since I waste lot of time when I have to map drives (My computer -> map network drives , and then I have to map to alph. letters 8 drives), I will create a batch file with "net use" command for each drive, and run it on the client when I am setting up a new user, or when established user is working on another PC. It just seems like if network admin. is using the scripts on every client and for every profile, each established user would have shared drives ready for use anytime they log in, regardles of which PC they log in. Thanx, Mickey :)
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  • Jaymz69
    We use a script at my work
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  • mikidc
    STAFFIT, Thank you for your input. I am not a network admin. I am a tech support and I have some admin. rights. I probably do not have rights to do what you are suggesting, but can you give little more detailed info, as to how to do it. Thank you, Mickey
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  • Redtyke
    Mickey, access to a network share is user based and not only depends on having that share mapped by means of e.g. a logon script, or group policy, but also the user having the correct access permissions to the share in question. Hope that helps. By the way, XP SP2 went end-of-life in July 2010, you should, if possible, install XP SP3.
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  • carlosdl
    Mickey, here are some articles you might want to take a look at: Logon scripts examples to map network drives Creating logon scripts Logon Script FAQ
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  • mikidc
    Redyke, I agree and understand. Before anything is done, I have to send a request to our ITS dept. to ask that they grant access to a user to share drives he will need. Only after I get that request approved and completed, I map the drives on his PC. Thank you for your input. Mickey
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  • mikidc
    Carlos, Thank you for info. I will definitely read from those sources. Mickey :)
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  • Sixball
    One last suggestions: Since yall are running on a domain, whats wrong with a Group Policy Object that specifies certain drive maps for all users in a particular group? With a GPO for drive maps, regardless of what PC you log in on, your drive maps will be consistant and connected... Something your ITS folks can set-up in a matter of minutes...
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  • mikidc
    Sixball, If I can tell those guys what to do, life would be soooo much easier for me, but they are isolated in their "ivory tower"; plus, this is governemt operation. I will try the friendly chat approach if I catch some of them in the halls. I like you idea. Thank you for the input. Mickey
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