locked files

pts.
Tags:
Hardware
Servers
I'm sure this will be an easy fix, but I am hitting a wall. I have a user that is trying to access and update a spreadsheet that is out on a network share. It is not allowing her to update giving her the error that it does not exist or that it has been locked. I went thru computer mgmt. and saw that the file was open and under #locks there are 3. I closed the open file and had her try it again with the same results. She and one other has full access to this file, but whenever they try to open it it comes up locked. I am able to access no problem. How can I "unlock" this file so they can access and update. Thanks in advance for your assistance

Answer Wiki

Thanks. We'll let you know when a new response is added.

PERMISSIONS – If you can open it and save it but they can’t then what is different about their logins?
You did not specify operating system, networking system, nor application. If I presume Excel on XP on Windows 2k/2k3 server, then it is NTFS permissions. The file is shared but not accessible to the users, but your admin login has access.

Good luck.

Discuss This Question: 8  Replies

 
There was an error processing your information. Please try again later.
Thanks. We'll let you know when a new response is added.
Send me notifications when members answer or reply to this question.

REGISTER or login:

Forgot Password?
By submitting you agree to receive email from TechTarget and its partners. If you reside outside of the United States, you consent to having your personal data transferred to and processed in the United States. Privacy
  • ItDefPat1
    Do you also have full access? Do a Save As to a new file name, give to to user, she computes into the sunset. . . Or (if you can't get access to yourself) restore from latest backup to new file. I don't know how frequently you net gets backuped, but user could version-ize (save to new file name, e.g. myfile050619.doc, myfile050620.doc).
    15 pointsBadges:
    report
  • Gsampson
    Thanks guys! Both users are on Win2K and the server is Win2K as well. I was able to get it working only by giving them the appropriate permissions to the parent folder. Why is it that if they have list/read access to a parent folder can I not give modify access to a file within that folder?
    0 pointsBadges:
    report
  • Darthzakkie
    ..because under the standard permissions for XP/NT/2k etc.. to be able to modify, you must allocate write permissions for the parent directory.. NTFS uses a treelike directory when dealing with permissions.. in other words, if your file is in one folder, whether a user has write permissions for the file depends on the write permissions for the parent folder..
    0 pointsBadges:
    report
  • Gsampson
    I'm really confused now. The way we have folder permissions structured here is we have a "Shared" folder with list permissions for authenticated users. They can list the contents of the folder. From there each dept. has a folder(s) where permissions are set according to need. As long as list access is granted on the parent folder we can get more granular with permissions on the folders beneath. Could this just be a problem with the folder in question? Thanks again for all the feedback!
    0 pointsBadges:
    report
  • Nephi1
    From what I've just been reading, You want 2 users to have access to the file, with the ability to modify the file. You can either give the user group (the group that the 2 users belong to) or the individual users access to the file, by adding them to the list. Then make sure that Modify, Read&Execute, Read, Write are ticked. But generally when you set up the share, you set the permissions at the folder/directory level, as NTFS automatically gives the child files & folders (the files and folders that live in the share.) the same permissions. This is where the idea of parent/child(ren) come into play. Consider this... C Drive | |-File1.txt | |-Folder1 | |-Folder 2 | |-File2.txt | |-Folder3 | |-Folder4 "C Drive" is the parent of everything there. File1.txt, Folder1, Folder2 are children of the parent "C Drive". And File2.txt, Folder3, Folder4 are children of the parent Folder2. Just as living things, children can have become parents, so a child in a structure like that can become parents. Also this structure can also be called trees.
    0 pointsBadges:
    report
  • Woody2812
    If you are using active directory why dont you create a security group and assign the group to the folder that you want the two users to have access to, then apply the read/write permission to the security group for that folder. Once this has been done just add the users to that group an hey presto they have read/write permissions to any file contained with in the folder. Also good as if you need any one elso to have access just add then to the new group making permission handling easy to control
    0 pointsBadges:
    report
  • Mintun
    If this has already been said - I apologize. With NTFS security, I have found you cannot just give access rights successfully at the file level. If done at the file level, our users would be able to open the file, if they had the folder rights to 'write' then they could save their changes, but now the resulting file would have the same ACL as the folder it's in. Since the 'modified' file is seen by NTFS as a 'new' file. How many wish we could force MS to use the Novell model for access control? :)
    0 pointsBadges:
    report
  • Threenil
    The only thing that you should need to do is set the security parameters for the folder tree. For instance if you set the users security to the folder to "change". They can edit the files but not modify their parameters within the tree (i.e. Ownership). In Excel 2003 if you go to "Tools > Share Workbook" and check off "Allow change by more than one user at the same time." They can both open it with read/write permissions. You also might want to activate merging so they do not overwrite each other.
    0 pointsBadges:
    report

Forgot Password

No problem! Submit your e-mail address below. We'll send you an e-mail containing your password.

Your password has been sent to:

To follow this tag...

There was an error processing your information. Please try again later.

REGISTER or login:

Forgot Password?
By submitting you agree to receive email from TechTarget and its partners. If you reside outside of the United States, you consent to having your personal data transferred to and processed in the United States. Privacy

Thanks! We'll email you when relevant content is added and updated.

Following