AS/400 Journal entry type IZ

30 pts.
Tags:
AS/400 commands
AS/400 journaling
iSeries Journalling
Journaling
Hi, I have a journal entry of type IZ and I was wondering what causes this to be generated? The documentation says it is from an INZPFM command but the program specified on the journal entry does not execute this command.
ASKED: October 28, 2010  1:24 PM
UPDATED: October 30, 2010  1:44 AM

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  • CharlieBrowne
    Are you sure the program that is running matches the source that you are looking at? Can you run the program again? If so, look at the file before and after the program is run to see if records were written. What is the program supposed to do?
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  • TomLiotta
    System facilities can use commands too. I don't know what may use INZPFM, but CRTPF or CHGPF with ALLOCATE(*YES) might do it, and other operations might also. When you run a SQL DELETE statement with no WHERE clause, the system can choose to run a CLRPFM operation instead. That's a common example of the system choosing to run a command function when the program doesn't specify the command. So, even though you don't run INZPFM, there are other actions against the file in the program. What types of references are there in the program against that file? Tom
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  • Ianjda
    I found out the following: When reviewing journal data, a mysterious F IZ entry may be found. This entry is for INZPFM . However, an INZPFM was never done to the file. This does not mean that an INZPFM was done to the file and no one is admitting to it. This entry is related to REUSEDLT records and concurrent writes. Concurrent writes improve performance to a file when several jobs attempt to write to a file at once. This is controlled by API QDBENCWT When several jobs are writing to a file, they each request a relative record number (RRN) to write to. They are assigned their RRN for the physical file; however, the actual journal entry write can occur in a different order. If the entry comes to the journal in a different order, an F IZ entry is used to initialize, or fill in, any unassigned RRNs in the journal. The following is an example: Job 1 gets assigned RRN 11. Job 2 gets assigned RRN 12. Job 3 gets assigned RRN 13. Job 1 writes a journal entry for RRN 11. Job 3 attempts to write a journal entry for RRN 13 but cannot leave a hole for RRN 12, so an F IZ for RRN 12 is written first. Job 2 writes a journal entry for RRN 12. A heavily modified SQL file can have occasional F IZ entries. It is done for performance reasons, and it is working as designed. I ran multiple instances of an RPG program which was writing records to a file that was journalled and saw many F IZ entries. So it's not just SQL.
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  • TomLiotta
    Excellent. For reference, documentation may be seen at SQL INSERT Causes an F IZ Entry to the Journal. Tom
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  • TomLiotta
    Minor added note -- The F IZ doesn't necessarily mean that any activity was done against that record location in the file. It only needs to be written to the journal in front of the entry for RRN 13 (from the example.) Having the entry in the journal allows for a more nearly perfect journal record of what happened to the file. If transactions are backed out one journal entry at a time, the physical condition of the file tends to be exactly the reverse of the sequence that originally happened, at least in terms of logical sequencing. The F IZ entry tells journal processing some information about the logical sequencing of I/O. Interesting (to me). Tom
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