IT Business

10 pts.
Tags:
Career Development
Careers
CCNA
Certifications
Hello everyone, I was wondering if anyone could give me advice on what's a good IT degree to start in a business? I was thinking of getting a CCNA and some other certifications and then starting some sort of business, but I don't really know what is good at the moment. Doesn't necessarily have to be networking oriented or anything, just whatever can get the most business and money. Any suggestions?

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The things in my area that are hot are VoIP, VMWare, and anything data-center. Don’t know if it’s the same deal in your area but anyways, hope that helps.

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  • Kevin Beaver
    The best school to go through is the school of hard knocks. Hands-on experience is key for being successful regardless of your chosen field. Before you go out on your own, however, you really need to know what you want, what you're good at, what motivates you, etc. Otherwise you're setting yourself up for failure in the not so distant future. Getting some hands-on experience working for other businesses may be the best way to go about doing this. Definitely think this through... Check out my IT and security career blog posts, audio books, and articles which should help point you in the right direction.
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  • BlankReg
    I'm with Kevin on this one. Experience is the key, all the qualifications in the world don't mean anything without the background in real events to fall back on. I have interviewed CCIE qualified engineers, who didn't know very basic fixes for common problems, as they had never really worked in the field, and seen these issues. Also, as Kevin says, find out what you like doing. If you enjoy what you do, even when the going is tough, it is much easier to get up in the morning and have another go.
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  • BlankReg
    Sorry - forgot to say that CCNA is a good place to start if you are interested in networing. It gives a good grounding in the basics, and some practical experience as well.
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  • Cheeseman
    Some of the CompTia certifications (Security+, Network+) are good, non-vendor specific certifications to gain some understanding of information technology. They are good stepping stones to other vendor specific certifications.
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  • Stiltner
    Comptia is the defacto standard for basic PC hardware, and connection knowledge. Security+ is highly regarded and with all the issues with hacks in major installations (i.e. large and medium business along with govt issues). You can rest assured that it will, or a subset of its information will become mandatory learning in many area's, having it IMO is NEVER a bad decision. If you work in, with, or for IT, security+ is a good one. Cisco Certs (CCNA, etc etc) will require you to have a considerable amount of hands on knowledge, as many of their questions are direct troubleshooting related, as are most other vendor certs liike Microsoft. Anything beyond those gets to be very job oriented. If you're just looking to start, ignore anything beyond these, they're the basics and the building blocks. You can worry about the super specific / heavily advanced when you get to that road.
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