IBM X3400 server with windows server 2003 and mail exchange we have about 15 users 5 of which do not only deal outlook emails but . . .

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IBM X3400 Server
Microsoft Exchange
Server configuration
Windows Server 2003
we have an IBM X3400 server with windows server 2003 and mail exchange we have about 15 users 5 of which do not only deal outlook emails but also hold their VB.net Project on server our mails sometimes contain 1-4 mb attachment as we deal in design issues illustrator and stuff, now we are in the process of buying a new hard desk for our server because it is nearly full we are going to bu a 320 GB, our current configuration is like this IBM X3400 with 3 GHz Quad core with 4 mb cash and IGB ram, we feel that our server is a little bit under load do you think that expanding the rams to 4 GB ram or more is adequate to ease the pressure on the server and make it work a more efficiently,? what configuration Update do you advice on the same server that we now have?
ASKED: June 5, 2008  1:19 PM
UPDATED: June 6, 2008  8:55 AM

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Hello,
upgrading a server is always a good thing but this must meet your capacity/growing plans. If your actual server’s RAM is enough for managing the email traffic and what is lacking is only the hard disk space, why are you also considering the RAM upgrade?
If you are getting the additional 3Gb RAM for few bucks go for it because this will make your server more “open” to future growths but if you are paying that 3GBs upgrade a bunch of money don’t go for it.
You may also consider what is the arranty/service status for your server, if it has still long life to go you can upgrade it, if instead your warranty/service is going to end in few months and the money needed for updating your warranty/service is too much, you may consider buying of a new server (compatible with the hard rrives you are going to buy) that will come with at least 2 years warranty.
Another solution may be buying an affordable NAS that you can connect to any server, the actual one or the future one.
Once again, everything depends on which plans the company has; rare hardware buyings+estimated growth=upgrade the server; frequent hardware buyings=don’t upgrade but wait; you need capacity soon but ignore plannings=buy NAS.
The above are only example of considerations you have to keep in mind.
I hope this helps.
Bye

Don’t forget to visit my blog:<a href=”http://itknowledgeexchange.techtarget.com/it-support/”> If it has a plug, it’s IT stuff!!</a>

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