i5/OS vs MS sequel server 2005

5 pts.
Tags:
.NET
i5/OS
iSeries
SQL Server 2005
The powers that be would like to replace our 20 year old i5 home grown billing system with a .NET solution (partial) over MS SQL Server 2005. How do we convince the powers that be to keep & improve what they have or should we just surrender and start taking .NET classes?
ASKED: August 14, 2008  2:54 PM
UPDATED: August 19, 2008  10:38 PM

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Hi,

You could start by pointing out that your i5 has hardly ever crashed because of hardware or operating system problems. Your system availability with an i5 is probably going to be better than with an MS platform.

The i5 has just about everything necessary bundled in the OS (except for your application, which you’ve developed over the years), the MS platform will need various software packages, utilities, databases, etc from different suppliers that may or may not be compatible with each other.

Does your intended .NET software work the way that you/your company want it to work or will it need to be tailored for your needs and how much will this cost/how long will it take? Are you going to change the way you work to fit the new software (sometimes this is easier or better)?

Regards,

Martin Gilbert.

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  • Pcatlin
    Hi... One additional thought to consider when looking at an MS / msSQL solution. Testing and Development... On the i5, you probably have a different set of libraries for testing (some have the luxury of separate partitions) however... On MS you will HAVE to have either a separate VM or a separate server for development and testing. Due to the nature of the SQL interface you will need to specify the database name and table name in your code. Because of that, you need to have a 2nd SQL server and app server to serve as the development environment. (If you need a QA environment add a 3rd set of servers or VM's.) These of course should be configured and patched identically to your production environment. As a result MS Servers (and their associated license costs) tend to multiply in your datacenter... Regards, Phil
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  • GreenleeB
    Do a little research into salaries for SQL Server DBAs (you will need one) and the developers with skills to write that .NET code. it's not 'just another language. It's a different world. i5 is an integrated box. It's all in there to code, test and deploy. The powers never take into consideration that you are talking about a complete paradigm shift in development vs. what you are used to in the i5 world. You won't even be productive for a year, with help. Shops, especially small ones, have taken the AS/400-i5 systems for granted because they don't need as much attention as the systems on the Dark-Side. One of my clients thinks nothing of having 8-10 people to support the server farm where there is one server per application but no one on staff for the iSeries except an operator/clerk and me. It just runs and runs and does it's work. What is the ROI on the .NET software? What advantage will it give the company? If you concentrate on the expense of moving and the continuing higher cost of ownership of the MS system vs. where you are now you may get some attention. Good luck.
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