How to extrapolate the weight of data in my laptop?

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Storage
I recently needed to change the disk in my laptop (Acer running Vista) and used an external bay to connect the old, then the new disk to a server, 

I happened to notice, when I removed the new drive, that it seemed to weigh more than when I plugged it in.  I carried out some tests, and found that the 'full' drive weighed more with data on it than after carrying out a full disk delete and reformat.  After I copied data to the new drive, it weighs more than when it was new.

Does anyone have the algorithm to relate data volumes to increase in weight? 

Does compressing the data with ZIP or TAR make it weigh more per megabyte?

Are there limits to this, or will it just keep getting heavier until it's completely full?

What difference does the operating system make ?

 

Thanks

 

 

 

 



Software/Hardware used:
Wester Digaital caviar drives, matched. Vista

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  • Meandyou
    You [B]are joking, right?
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  • Yorkshireman
    I agree - really?? This is a very strange observation. What is the weight before and the weight after? What was the blank capacity of the drive before? How much data was added? HDDs record data by magnetizing ferromagnetic material directionally, to represent either a 0 or a 1 binary digit. They read the data back by detecting the magnetization of the material. No weight should be added to the drive unless there is corrosion of the material.
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  • carlosdl
    What did you use to weigh the disks ? What were the exact weights after and before ? It could be the "psychologic" weight what augmented... :-)
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  • JennyMack
    Guys, he's right. My hard drive is almost full, and I can barely lift my laptop anymore. =) Yorkshireman, I think this calls for a YouTube video. As the kids say, "pics or it didn't happen."
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  • Michael Morisy
    This is definitely my favorite question this week.
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  • Meandyou
    I was thinking of this over the past few days and I realized that a zero is larger then a one - compare these two figures: 0 1 the one is almost one dimensional, it is almost non existent. My conclusion is that data that is composed of more zeros than ones will weigh more than data that is composed of mostly ones. compare these two bytes: 0100 0001 1011 1110 Obviously, the first byte of data would weigh more than the second. Steve
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  • philpl1jb
    Content should factor in .. Grapes of Wrath - HEAVY Travels with Charlie - light. Phil
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  • Kevin Beaver
    It could be the pull towards magnetic north...or too many JPEG images on your drive - they're chock full of compressed bits.
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  • Yorkshireman
    If the argument is true that there is more weight (mass) in a 0 compared to a 1, then the disk could also become out of balance. The disk should be taken to a disk balancing center to ensure performance is maintained by regular maintenance.
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  • carlosdl
    I'm thinking that maybe disk fragmentation is intentionally created by the OS, as a method for balancing the disks.
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  • Yorkshireman
    ahhh yes, the addition of random entropy into the environment. Good point Carlosdl.
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  • Technochic
    Perhaps the disk is just "bloated". You have been taking everything with a "grain of salt". Stop that imediately and the bloating of the drive should cease.
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  • philpl1jb
    So is that why the guy at Jiffy Lube wants to rotate my discs?
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  • Yorkshireman
    wow... does Jiffy Lube provide IT services now? Or is it just the folks who used to be the Geek Squad?
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  • philpl1jb
    If you want your computer to run fast you've got to get the bit paths lubed.
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