How TCP/IP,IPX/SPX ans SNA integrate together?

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Network protocols
Novell IPX/SPX
SNA/APPC/APPN/LU6.2
TCP
Suppose Season is a large regional bakery company that supplies baked goods (e.g.doughnuts,bread,pastries) to cafeterias,grocery stores and convenience store in 3 states.The company has 5 separate bakeries and office spread over the region and wants to connect the 5 locations. Unfortunately,the network infrastructure at the 5 locations has grown up separately and there are 3 network/transport layer protocols in used (TCP/IP,IPX/SPX ans SNA). - How can the company connect the locations that use different protocols togethers? - How can the SNA integrate with the other 2 protocols?
ASKED: March 31, 2005  4:34 AM
UPDATED: April 1, 2005  11:48 AM

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  • Bobkberg
    My first reaction - Howard2nd is right - we've seen students trying to get us to do their homework for them before, and no doubt will again. What makes your request blatantly obvious is that you didn't even bother to do enough work on the problem to put it into real-world language, with a real-world understanding of the issues underlying the posed problem. However, I'll give you a hint or so.. 1) Plan an upgrade project away from IPX/SPX. Even Novell doesn't use it any more except for customer support and some legacy stuff. 2) Tunnel SNA through IP, and look at what the current vendors (IBM primarily) are offering in the way of progress. 3) Do your own research to where you actually understand the problem enough. When you look to get a "canned" solution from a group like this, we're generally going to assume that you have the background understanding (context) to adapt whatever reply you get to your situation. If I found one of my employees (and I've worked with a few) who wanted to hide everything - including problems and such - from co-workers and management until it was perfect, I'd fire him or her. Bob
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  • Fll0415
    Thanks for your reply.I am a network students here and I totally don't even know what is network.That's why I posted my question here so that someone can guide me on that particular problems but not giving me "ANSWER".At least the guidance help me more in my research. I am totally stuck in my network subjects...... Thanks
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  • Fll0415
    Thanks for your reply.I am a network students here and I totally don't even know what is network.That's why I posted my question here so that someone can guide me on that particular problems but not giving me "ANSWER".At least the guidance help me more in my research. I am totally stuck in my network subjects...... Thanks
    0 pointsBadges:
    report
  • Fll0415
    Thanks for your reply.I am a network students here and I totally don't even know what is network.That's why I posted my question here so that someone can guide me on that particular problems but not giving me "ANSWER".At least the guidance help me more in my research. I am totally stuck in my network subjects...... Thanks
    0 pointsBadges:
    report
  • Bobkberg
    Ok - this doesn't make a lot of sense, in that you say you're a network student but don't know what a network is. This is really not a subject for a forum such as this, but I'll try. First of all, I recommend that you get a copy of Andrew Tannenbaum's Computer Networking. Second, there are several elements that make up a working network. They are usually referred to by their place in the OSI 7 layer model (some models have more or fewer layers, but the idea is the same). Layer 1 is the physical medium: Ethernet (10, 100, 1000 Mb)and is specified by voltages, wiring types, connector types and signalling arrangements. Fiber optic would be similar except that it is wavelengths of light, types of fiber and physical connections for that wire. Layer 2 is the datalink layer: This consists of a way to get a packet of data from point A to point B, and is pretty much agreed upon the world over. There are differing standards, but way fewer than there used to be. But - and this is the key thing - this rides ABOVE the physical layer, so, for example an IPX or IP packet can easily traverse different media. Layer 3 is the networking layer: This made up of various protocols, such as the ones you quoted, and many others. Always bear in mind that a "protocol" simply means "an agreed upon standard of behavior in a given environment". Royal courts in varying countries throughout history had protocols. In some places, letting your shadow touch the king (or whoever) could result in a death sentence. If you knew the protocol, then you never did that sort of thing. You can think of IPX/SPX, IP, SNA and some of the others as "languages". They aren't really languages though, they're agreed upon standards of behavior at a computing level. But they might as well be different languages. If I speak only German to you, and you only speak English to me - we're not likely to get much communicating done. Above the networking layer are other layers, and the higher you go in the layer model, the closer you are to getting some work done that most humans actually care about. The OSI model uses the terms: "Datagram", "Session", "Presentation" and "Application" IPX/SPX was an early protocol (adapted from the original Xerox networking protocol XNS) adopted and made popular by Novell's Netware product. SNA is a mainframe communications protocol used by IBM for their mainframe related communications. TCP/IP is the standard developed for the Internet and is pretty much the global standard. So what your assignment revolves around is how to deal with different environments, applications and such, and how to set up a method for making the whole thing work together. Does that help? Bob
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  • Fll0415
    The following statement is abstract from IBM : There are several different ways of running mixed protocol communication over single protocol transport networks. IBM provides the following solutions to intermix SNA and TCP/IP: ? Data link switching (DLSw). SNA traffic is encapsulated in TCP packets. What is mean by "SNA traffic is encapsulated in TCP packets.?" Is it if we want to use a singple protocol for Fred's Donut,then DLSw is suitable for switching the SNA to TCP/IP? Thanks
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  • Fll0415
    The following statement is abstract from IBM : There are several different ways of running mixed protocol communication over single protocol transport networks. IBM provides the following solutions to intermix SNA and TCP/IP: ? Data link switching (DLSw). SNA traffic is encapsulated in TCP packets. What is mean by "SNA traffic is encapsulated in TCP packets.?" Is it if we want to use a singple protocol for Season Company,then DLSw is suitable for switching the SNA to TCP/IP? Thanks
    0 pointsBadges:
    report
  • Fll0415
    the following statement is abstract from IBM: There are several different ways of running mixed protocol communication over single protocol transport networks. IBM provides the following solutions to intermix SNA and TCP/IP: ? Data link switching (DLSw). SNA traffic is encapsulated in TCP packets. What is mean by "SNA traffic is encapsulated in TCP packets.?" Is it if we want to used only one protocol for Season Company,then DLSw is used for switching the SNA to TCP/IP? Thanks
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  • Bobkberg
    Think of using encapsulation as taking a taxi to your destination. Before you enter the taxi, you're identifiably "you". During the ride, you simply appear as one more taxi on the road. When you arrive, you're "you" again. Under this assumption, TCP/IP is the "taxi". But the "taxi" simply goes from place to place, not caring who its passengers are. There will be special software at each end for encapsulating and decapsulating the SNA traffic. By the way - any idea why your replies are showing up 3 times? Bob
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