How fast does IPv6 run?

Tags:
Application acceleration
enterprise WAN
IPv4
IPv6
Network performance
WAN
WAN optimization
Does the IPv6 protocol perform any faster than the IPv4 protocol? Would there be any need for a network running IPv6 to use an application acceleration or other network performance enhancing device? Does that answer change when an organization is running a dual-stack (both IPv4 and IPv6) environment?
ASKED: November 5, 2012  7:49 PM

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Hi

Once we have upgraded larger parts of our networks to IPv6, there may be some speed advantages thanks to optimized forwarding (fixed length header, no options in base IPv6 header, no fragmentation on routers etc). But I would guess the main factor that decides on performance is the vendor’s implementation.

Key equipment has to be carefully tested for performance under load, for all scenarios used, such as dual-stack, IPv4-only and IPv6-only.

Silvia

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  • TomLiotta
    I'm not aware of any speed difference between IPv4 and IPv6.  I'm not sure that it's relevant in any significant way. -- Tom
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  • TomLiotta
    Once we have upgraded larger parts of our networks to IPv6...   That is an important element to watch. While routes may contain IPv4-tunneling segments (which may exist for quite a while), IPv6 fragmentation advantages can actually turn into disadvantages under some circumstances. Aggressive filtering of ICMP at intermediate points along a route can cause loss of ICMPv6 "Packet too big" errors for example, and that can cause offsetting delays. Other conditions are possible and must be learned by numerous administrators and network technicians.   Once we're actually using IPv6 in general, in our local networks and across the internet, things should fall more into place.   Tom
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  • Harrypotterr
    I think ipv6 will be more easier to handle,as it provides us so many options.
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  • TomLiotta
    I think ipv6 will be more easier to handle...   That's possible, though I don't expect it.   IPv4 will be around for quite a while, which means that both will need to learned and handled at the same time. From what I've seen, there are misconceptions about IPv4 at many sites. A number of those are going to be carried over to IPv6.   Also, there have been past examples of 'many options' that haven't been fully understood. PL/I comes to mind. It's not clear how fewer options would make IPv4 harder to handle, especially if IPv6 is in addition to IPv4.   Perhaps by the time that IPv4 is almost completely gone, things will be different.   Tom.
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