How concerned are you about your patient records being breached?

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Data privacy
Data security breaches

The NSA isn’t the only security issue that is concerning the American populace. A recent study conducted annually by Lieberman Research Group on behalf of Unisys, offers a snapshot of the nation's sense of confidence in national, personal, internet and financial security. Halfway through 2013, this year's survey found 59% of Americans concerned about a patient data breach in healthcare organizations, with 31% pegging themselves as "somewhat" concerned and 29% as "very" concerned.Where do you fall on this scale?How concerned are you about your patient records being breached?

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  • TomLiotta
    It's hard to determine the value of patient records. My actual personal health-and-condition records don't bother me much at all right now, but secondary identification info is always a major concern. That's true regardless whether it's a "breach" or it's misuse of identifying data by the health provider. . In the very long term, though, I'm very concerned about medical data, especially DNA. There isn't much we can do with DNA info "today" (as far as is publicly known). But there is no predicting what might be possible a year, five years or ten years from now. . A very large DNA database has potentially huge future benefits for someone. Designer drugs, for example, are becoming more common. Treatments customized to individuals has great potential benefit. But there are also negative potentials. And the rapid increase in understanding epigenetics is probably of much more concern. . Suddenly we're potentially close to predicting an individual's reaction to some set of circumstances from statistical studies of genetics and epigenetics. Individual tendencies may be within reach. . Government access to DNA is close to being a serious risk to citizens. Private organizations present similar risks, though maybe not so close. . Today I'm not very bothered about my general medical records (minus SSN, etc.) But in the future? Who knows? We, the public, don't know. And that's very worrisome. . Tom
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  • Kevin Beaver
    Chris, thanks for the stats. I believe if people truly understood how their health-related information was being mishandled beyond the Notice of Privacy Practices, these numbers would be much higher. As time progresses and more and more people have their personal information compromised, experience identity theft, etc. we'll start holding more businesses accountable. The downside to that is the bureaucrats who don't understand the laws we already have on the books will posture about how we need even more regulation that will, in turn, do very little fix the problem.
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  • CarlCioffi
    I'd have to agree with businesses being accountable. I've had my identity stolen twice in the last 3 years. One was a person in North Vietnam trying to buy a fake diploma at fakediplomas.com and $185. Of course, I have alerts setup on my debit card for pretty much any transaction so I have never lost anything but when I called the people at fakediplomas.com and asked if they thought it was strange for a person with a billing address in Massachusetts to be buying a fake diploma from North Vietnam he just blew me off. I mean really fakediplomas.com how blatant is that. Unfortunately, he gave away the fake diploma and didn't get a nickel for it or the shipping cost.
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  • CarlCioffi
    Aside from my SSN I could care less who sees my medical records. I'm 61 and I have 1 visit to the hospital. My medical history is pretty short. We're paranoid about everything in this country.
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  • ToddN2000
    It would take someone months if not longer to go through my medical history. A few years back I was in hospital for 4 months. That's a lot of data and paper work to go through and for what purpose?? Don't get me wrong, security is a big deal but I worry about internal issues. My wife had her personal information stolen by an employee of a major bank a few years ago. The employee apparently stole the ID's of around 75,000 customers. The bank sent us a letter informing us of the breach and provided 3 years of credit protection. That worries more than a hacking attempt. As a side note, this same bank not to long ago had lost some backup tapes, UNENCRYPTED TAPES ... That made it time to change banks.
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