How can I switch into the networking field from a software development background?

1,545 pts.
Tags:
branch IT
Engineers
IT careers
IT training and certifications
Networking
Software development
I completed my engineering in branch IT, but now I don't want to go into the s/w (software) field. I'm much more interested in networking and hardware. What are my options for switching over?
ASKED: August 16, 2008  1:29 AM
UPDATED: August 16, 2008  3:00 PM

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Dear Sir or Madam;

Sometimes short questions like yours imply a world of additional information; always they fail to include it. In the absence of more specifics about exactly what it is that you’re currenty doing, what you do and don’t like about it, and what’s impelling you to move away from that work I can’t say much about your current circumstances. Likewise, without telling me what areas of networking you find most appealing, what kind of networking positions you’d most like to occupy, and how much or how little you already know or have worked with networking, I’m at a bit of a loss in producing a response that’s sufficiently tailored to do you much good. You should tell me more about yourself, and fill in the missing blanks I’ve just outline above, if you want to derive the greatest benefit from my input and advice.

All that said, the old Nike catchphrase “Just do it.” still has merit here. If you’re developing software, you have to know something about computer operating systems, source control environments, debugging and testing tools, and so forth. A lot of the processes involved in designing, building, and maintaining code are pretty similar to the processes involved in designing, building, and maintaining networks. Thus, you could (and very well probably may) benefit from some “knowledge transfer” from your old line of work to this new one.

But without knowing whether for example you want to design and build networks, administer them, or work at researching and developing new networking technologies or improving existing ones, it’s difficult for me to offer other advice about what to do next.

If you’ll tell me more about yourself, your current work situation, your education, knowledge and skills, and what you’d rather be doing instead, I can chime in again to make some more specific recommendations.

Good luck in your career planning and development process.

–Ed–

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