How can I setup a DNS server to respond with an IP address when an A record doesn’t exist?

pts.
Tags:
DNS
DNS management
IP address
How can I setup Microsoft’s DNS server to respond with an IP address when an ‘A’ record does not exist? For example, let’s say someone goes to something.mydomain.com but there’s no ‘A’ record for the subdomain, something.mydomain.com. Is it possible to still have Microsoft’s DNS Server respond with a valid (default) IP for the domain? I know that other DNS providers do provide this feature but I haven’t figured it out yet with Microsoft. Thanks in advance for your time and consideration.

Answer Wiki

Thanks. We'll let you know when a new response is added.

There always has to be an A type record at some point along the path. There can be a CNAME record that may resolve to a particular name that then resolves to the IP address of interest. Somewhere there has to be an authoritative nameserver for the domain that holds these records. There could also be header records on the website that redirects a visitor to particular content. This is dependent on the webserver.

Discuss This Question: 1  Reply

 
There was an error processing your information. Please try again later.
Thanks. We'll let you know when a new response is added.
Send me notifications when members answer or reply to this question.

REGISTER or login:

Forgot Password?
By submitting you agree to receive email from TechTarget and its partners. If you reside outside of the United States, you consent to having your personal data transferred to and processed in the United States. Privacy
  • CosmoC
    I don’t believe Microsoft DNS allows an asterisk in a host record name through the MMC DNS console. To create a wildcard A record you must create a subdomain named with an asterisk then create a blank A record in that subdomain. You can use the dnscmd.exe tool (or call the API directly). dnscmd.exe DNSServerName /RecordAdd mydomain.com * A x.x.x.x [If your Server is a 2000 box, you will need to enable LooseWildcarding first]. Wildcard A records are possible but using CNAME wildcards are usually a better way to go. Create an A record for all something.mydomain.com requests, then create a CNAME *.mydomain.com which points to it. Keep in mind the HTTP HOST header will not get updated once it’s resolved. If madeup.mydomain.com gets forwarded to defaultsite.mydomain.com the header will remain madeup.mydomain.com. You will probably want to create a virtual host which redirects all 'unknown' hostnames to defaultsite.mydomain.com.
    280 pointsBadges:
    report

Forgot Password

No problem! Submit your e-mail address below. We'll send you an e-mail containing your password.

Your password has been sent to:

To follow this tag...

There was an error processing your information. Please try again later.

REGISTER or login:

Forgot Password?
By submitting you agree to receive email from TechTarget and its partners. If you reside outside of the United States, you consent to having your personal data transferred to and processed in the United States. Privacy

Thanks! We'll email you when relevant content is added and updated.

Following