How can I get the exact Lotus Notes Form that the document actually created?

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Lotus Notes
Lotus Notes Development
Lotus Notes Forms
I have two Forms. 1. MyFirstForm|RTF 2. MyNextForm|RTF I create two documents one from first Form and other form second one. In both document properties there is Form field 'RTF'. So how can I get the exact Form that the document actually created. I want this in my programming code in C or C#.

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What is the purpose of having two forms with the same alias. I have never done this. Please explain.

Just add an additional text field to the original forms with the actual form name you want to reference.

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  • Sppradip
    I want to use alias same for same type FORMS. But as this is also possible scenario, there is no question about the purpose.
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  • Ledlincoln
    Picture it this way. The document is the data. The document can be created or viewed in any form. The alias of the form is what will be stored in the form field, and will dictate how the data is viewed (in what form) the next time the document is opened. I think it is bad practice to have two different forms with the same alias - how does Notes determine which to use? On the other hand, it is perfectly acceptable to have two aliases for one form. For example, you may want to rename a form at a later time, but you don't want to modify the form field in every document. Keep the original name as the alias and enter the new name to the left, separated by the pipe character. In this example, "New FormName" will appear in the Create menu, while "Original FormName" is stored in the form field of each document. New FormName | Original FormName
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  • Brooklynegg
    As previously mentioned in the Answer section (addition by RodHogeland), you can add a computed-when-composed field to each form and calculate a unique value in that field. The name of the field could be Form_Orig. When you traverse the document object in your C# code, you can reference this field to take distinct actions based on its value. Note that forms are GUIs that contain code to support business rules. Documents are created by Save actions on forms (and other backend actions that can compute a new document based on the form of your choice). Therefore your statement in your original question is backward -- "how can I get the exact Form that the document actually created" -- this is not what happens. The documents are created when saved in a form, not the other way around. (just wanted to be clear on that point). Finally, I did think of a common example in which multiple forms have the same alias. However, this is used to present the proper form for the client. For instance, a Calendar form for Notes, Web, or Mobile could each have the same alias. Depending on which interface the user is in, the correctly formatted and coded form would be used. Hope this helps.
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  • Sppradip
    THnx all of you I think it will help me
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