Fidelity AS/400 Questions

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AS/400
AS/400 jobs
Hi All, Is there anyone who can provide some questions on AS/400 for fidelity interview. Thanks and Regards Ankit

Software/Hardware used:
AS400

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I don’t mind doing interviews. I don’t mind answering thoughtful questions. But I’m not thrilled about answering questions like, ‘If you were being mugged, and you had a lightsaber in one pocket and a whip in the other, which would you use?’


Harrison Ford

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  • TomLiotta
    What is "fidelity interview"? Tom
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  • ankit2002
    @Tom: It is the name of the company where I am going to give AS400 technical interview.
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  • TomLiotta
    Do you know what skills they're looking for? Development or maintenance? Languages? Systems support? Networking? Internet? Database? What is the environment? Large system? Multiple systems? Small systems? LPARs? Guest OSs? What OS releases? Do they need 3rd-party package support? What general industry are they in? The possibilities are many. A little guidance is needed. Tom
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  • vageesh
    what exp level are they looking for . Interview q depends on that . Pls let me know then I can help u out
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  • philpl1jb
    Please don't post interview questions. We would like to discuss how to prepare for interview, how to respond to questions at interview. etc. 
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  • TomLiotta
    About 20 years ago, I was an interview panel member for a DP Manager position. ("DP" was more common back then, though things had been changing to "IS" and "IT" for a while.) Three of us from the DP staff ere on that panel, and there were a couple other panels from other offices in the organization. Each of us had our own chosen questions. The one of mine that I was most interested in was something like "Please describe your personal SDM and PMM approaches." After the first two candidates had trouble understanding the question and stumbling through their responses when given some explanations, our panel was waiting before the third and final candidate arrived. The other two panel members asked me not to ask that question again. I explained how much information is obtained from the answers. First, neither candidate knew "SDM" (System Development Methodology) nor "PMM" (Project Management Methodology) as terms. Once the acronyms were defined, answers were a little better but still required various proddings to get useful info back. And neither candidate gave answers that either of the other panel members felt comfortable with. IMO, a 'Manager' at least ought to recognize the terms. It's reasonable to ask for a definition just to be sure they're on the right track, but familiarity with 'methodology' concepts seemed a requirement at the least. The personality that comes through when answering such a question, though, tells a lot about the person. I said I'd ask the question again, and both the other members reluctantly agreed. Perhaps luckily for me, the third and final candidate handled the question with comfortable ease. The question was not only immediately understood, but the personal management philosophies were well stated and really resonated with all panel members. All other questions were satisfactorily answered, but it was that specific question that let us give a unanimous recommendation to upper management. Technical questions can be much less useful in an interview than the ways that questions are answered. I often ask questions that I don't expect to be answered with technical correctness. What I want to know is often 'how' the question is answered rather than 'what' the answer is. Technical answers can be looked up in reference documentation. I'd often be more interested in someone who can quickly look up an answer than someone who has it memorized. For a technical position, I might have a laptop connected to a server and have it scripted to present a short series of problems. Have the candidate fix the problems. E.g., a COBOL developer might first see an editor showing a small COBOL module with a bug. How is the laptop used to diagnose and fix the bug? Tom
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  • philpl1jb
    I don't mind doing interviews. I don't mind answering thoughtful questions. But I'm not thrilled about answering questions like, 'If you were being mugged, and you had a lightsaber in one pocket and a whip in the other, which would you use?'Harrison Ford
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  • TomLiotta
    Since many of us have light sabres in our pockets, a whip is the only good choice. (After all, light sabres are imaginary and not much good in a mugging.) -- Tom
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  • philpl1jb
    try again .. this maybe better. 
    Unfortunately, many job interview questions are nearly 
    that absurd.  
     
    If there are technical questions (perhaps RPG) they are
     often on obscure issues.  It’s totally valid to 
    respond:
    ”I haven’t used that command and cannot answer that 
    question, however, I’m looking forward to learning 
    new things.  I know how to find the answers in the 
    manuals and I expect that you have code examples 
    where that command has been used and mentors to 
    guide me.
     
    I’m sure you have standards and want the similar methods
     used in new development and maintenance and that is 
    certain to require that I learn to use specific methods.”
     
    They will also ask you about your strengths and weaknesses.
    They may ask you to talk about a success you had in your 
    job, about something that didn’t go well.  
    They may ask you about your current or previous employer.
      Make all of your responses positive.
     
    There may be math and logic tests.  
    There may be personality tests. 
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  • ankit2002
    It is for 3 years Experience in AS400,RPG,RPGLE. Please share if you have any link for the question.
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  • CharlieBrowne
    Do you have 3 years experience with AS400,RPG,RPGLE?  If not why are you applying for the job? The best answer to interview questions is to just give honest answers and be yourself. If you tell lies, they will catch up with you. Research the company. Ask them questions like: Is the a new position? What is your attrition rate?
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  • philpl1jb
    What is your attrition rate? .. not such a good question .. Why is this opportunity available?  Why did you choose to work for this company? At three years you should be able to answer some questions about some of these fields (depending on the specifics of your last job): Subfiles Physical and Logical Files F specs Embedded SQL Printer files Edit codes and edit words CL Programs Calling RPG program Multi-module programs Service Programs ILE stuff Good luck    
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