Exchange Server 2003 .local

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Microsoft Exchange
We have an Exchange Server 2003 running on a Windows 2003 Server. The internal domain name is abc.local. Is it possible to configure the Exchange Server so that users who log on to that domain can send and receive email mail from outside the domain? Eg: me@xyz.com? Thank you

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Your users now hae a default SMTP address of user@abc.local. What you need to do is to add another SMTP address of user@xyz.com and make it the primary SMTP address. This can be done through ADUC and select the tab Exchange Address (I think that is the tab–don’t have it right in front of me).

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  • Petroleumman
    Hello, It sounds like your Exchange server currently is configured for local use (inter-domain)activity, if this is true then your going to have some additional work to do before you can successfully begin sending and receiving mail on the Internet. First off, make sure you have the proper ports configured on your firewall to allow traffic in and out of your network. Configure port 25 for SMTP traffic and if your planning to set up OWA you'll need to add port 443 as well. Once you've got your firewall ready to allow traffic in and out, on your server make sure you turn off relaying. You do not want to expose your server to the Internet as an open relay! You can find relay settings by expanding SMTP protocol => Default SMTP VS => Properties => Access. A good basic config for relaying is to click the radio button for 'Allow only the list below to relay' and leave the add field empty then check the box at the bottom of the page labled 'allow all computers that authenticate to relay regardless of the list above'. This will allow your users to relay while blocking all outsiders from using your server as a relay. Last item to check is your DNS. If you don't have one already, make sure to add an MX record to your public (external) DNS records. The MX record will point Internet message traffic at your server. Without this record no one outside of your local network will be able to see your server. Also make sure to plug in the addresses to your external DNS servers (usually your ISP's DNS)in the SMTP virtual server's properties (Delivery tab => Advanced). Now you should be ready to create your .com SMTP addresses for your users and ready to send and receive Internet mail! Good Luck
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  • Kbinger
    Along with doing the above mentioned, you need to create a Recipinet Policy for that domain name so the Exchange Server knows to handle the email for that domein. To do so, open Exchange System Mgr expand Recipients, right click on Recipient Policies and create new Recipient Policy, select Email Addresses (you can also check Mailbox Manager Settings), enter in a name (descriptive name), then on the Email Addresses Tab, edit the default SMTP name to be @xz.com. When you click Apply and OK, you are asked if you want to update/add the smtp email address to all users with the newly created domain name. You can accept that and it should create an email address for each user. I've seen where it doesn't though. Worse case you may have to create an additional email address for each user under AD Users & Computers.
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