ERP Implementation

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ERP
I support a government customer who is about to embark on a major ERP implementation. I am currently providing cost estimating and analysis support to this customer in terms of what it costs to implement an ERP solution. In my research I have found several metrics to use in estimating as well as several identified risks concerning implementation. However, I was wondering if anyone who has actually been involved in implementing ERP solutions has any advice concerning risks, estimating methods, etc. Thanks in advance.

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a good suggestion could be to find anyone with at least two good implementation experiences and work with him because i think is not so much important the metrics but the tips and tricks nad experience to save a lot of time and money and to be succesfull on such a project

another important consideration is the change management
all the people are conservative and you have to find the right way to change their mind smoothly

to be more helpfull we need more info about the project and the requirements

good chance
bye

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  • Farmboy69
    I've been doing this for over 20 years and the best adivce I can give you is to not under estimate the input from the real users of the software, the users. Try to gain an understanding of the how the software will need to be used in real life, so to speak. Finally, a game plan is essential to a good project but also be ready for those unforeseen glitches that will pop up along the way. Build in some extra time to handle these.
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  • HappyGene
    Wiley, Sounds interesting, and there.s very much to say. But, first: 1. Is your client a gov entity or a contractor providing them good/services? 2. Is your estimation going to be of pure implementation of the ERP product or acheiving the ERP.s goals? 3. Are you asked to consider financial/workforce repurcussions of your client.s implementation or their liability if that implementation fails against .their. client.s criteria? 4. If they.re about to embark, they.ve probably narrowed their sights on a few products; so, is your task to identify cost based on scale or process disruption? Or both? 5. Is this a point source solution they.re considering, binding hard/software, or software only (perhaps a custom app?) 6. Is it a true ERP your client wants, not a hybrid that augments their current system and/or best-of-breed apps? 7. Will you be delivering the ROI forecast, or will the client.s CFO/CIO pair do that? 8. Hopefully, the ERP adopted will enable the company.s stated mission, but frequently, the package ends up noticeably re-defining the company. So, are you prepared to estimate core change impact for the company or least field questions about the shifing in-process? 9. Are there existing metrics from your client about key-strokes per product item out; time from order in to item out; personnel .touches. per item out; etc? 10. Do you have a way to measure bandwith per item out or for the estimated change needed? 11. Will use of the ERP increase throughput to the extent that the client.s exposure to gov industrial regulations will also increase? 12. Do you have a .gut. feeling if the ERP will be fully implemented, perhaps as a showcase for their industry, or just partially used to expedite a certain project? Answering these questions might clarify your approach. If you have time to address them here, we.ll move on to some particulars. :) Gene
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  • Solutions1
    For a complex customer with significant pre-implementation process design and customizatiion issues plus substantial data migration and training needs, think in terms of a 10:1 ratio of total cost of implementation compared to software licence cost. A rule of thimb like 10:1 might not be quite right, but it males it clear that the visible purchase price is the tip of the iceberg.
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  • WayneT123
    As a government worker who manages both engineering and IT related projects I would give you the following advise: 1. Assuming this is a full-on ERP solution to be implemeneted, the way your customer works will be changed. Therefore this project will require change/culture management to be succcessful. 2. You must get the end users (not their managers) involved early and often. You must have their buy-in into how the software will work. 3. Training will be critical for a successful implementation. Do not cut corners in this area, as this and extensive end user involvement will determine whether your project is successful from a management perspective. 4. You must find ways to engage the end user in the project. End users will not give you all of thir requirements up front, get them through an interative process. 5. The odds are your best estimate (at least what management will accept) will not be enough, have a healthy contingency. 6. Try to convince management to roll-out the ERP solution in a phased manner, either based on organizational structure or functionality. Keep it as simple as schedule, budget, and need can tolerate.
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  • Arthur101
    I have scoped, sold and led ERP implemetations and there are a number of critical points. 1. the project plan should not be allowed to start until the project infrastructure is truly in place. Sounds trivial but weeks lost here are very dificult to recover. 2. Implement change management, requests, costings and approvals immediately. These can work for and against the the end user but alerts everybody to the need to track and cost change. 3. Examine your project plan very carefully to identify trhe amount of project management time (and cost) that is planned. If you have planned less than 15% resources to PM then you face project problems usually delays. Successful projects sometimes have as much as 25%of the project manpower cost dedicated to PM. This is counting all supervisory and project office activity. 4. Others have said it, your end users are key, their buy-in and knowledge will be what counts at the end. Unfortunately many public sector ERP implementations have been "delivered" but subsequent audits reveal that the users do not believe they have a working solution. 5. I like to have a very senior level meeting in which I indicate the number of hours and the named managers with whom I expect the project to interact during the first few phases. This gets the attention of the CEO or CFO and in subsequent meetings you can give feedback on how you are using their executives valuable time. It also alerts subordinates who may be blockers to the fact that you have high level access which does no harm at all. 6. Manage project progress weekly and report weekly even if there is only a monthly senior level review. This allows more rapid escalation if the need arises. 7. Training is important so that customers (users) in workshops can relate their corporate terminology and functions to that of the product. In the long term it is desireable to adopt the product's terminology if at all possible. I can be reached on +447768647445
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  • MichelleDavidson
    Amilcar Alvarez sent the editors at Search400.com this advice: You will need to address four critical points with any ERP implementation. 1. Get it done by someone with HANDS-ON EXPERIENCE in that particular ERP solution... let's say, anyone with at least three successful implementations. Why? Because manuals and guides don?t include a lot of time-saving tips, hints and tricks; they become "available" only through experience. 2. Think about TRAINING as a top priority. Don't wait until the Go Live date to start training your personnel. Set a temporary environment to be run in parallel with the live environment and use it for training purpose while the data migration and ERP customization are going on. Not only you will save time, but your personnel will be more confident in using the software by the time the Go Live date arrives... and you can translate that into no panic and le$$ error$. 3. Give yourself enough TIME to deal with the unknown. Don't underestimate Murphy's Laws. Taking all phases into account -- from data migration to user confidence -- an ERP implementation will take eight to 10 months to reach maturity. 4. If possible, don't shut down the ERP solution you are replacing. Run both ERPs in parallel for one month using the old as primary and the new one (its Live environment after data migration) as secondary in order to COMPARE RESULTS. Do the same data entry in both ERPs and run the End of Month when scheduled... results must be 99% identical, you can accept a variance of 1% maximum. Only when this accuracy is reached, can you shut down the old ERP and keep going. By taking all those steps, my company just finished the implementation of a new ERP with a 100% accuracy in the procedures. No data missed, no money lost. Hope this helps.
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  • Lkeeter
    I have been through many ERP/MRP implementations over the past 20 years and after reading all the replies the following is also very important. The ERP system selected should support both Accounting and Manufacturing as much as possible. Most ERP systems designed are stronger in Accounting as MRP systems in Manufacturing. Determine the need from the client and don't fall short on the selection.
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