Encoded vector view in AS400

335 pts.
Tags:
AS/400
Hi I have a question on encoded vector view.what exactly it is. As iam using normal logical files using DDS.this logical files iam using in rpgle programs to read the file and update in my work file. Now my people are saying that logical files are taking more space on system. They are suggesting me to create encoded vector view,where totally new to this new word,if so can we craete encoded vector view as normal logical file and can i use it in my rpgle programs. how far it helps in saving space on the system and even performance too. As they are non as400 programmers how can i explain them abou this logical file and vector view please explain me on this clearly with exampls. Thanks

Software/Hardware used:
AS400 - database
ASKED: November 15, 2011  12:53 PM
UPDATED: November 16, 2011  2:34 PM

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Hi Tom

Can You please me more detailed way,as i didn’t get the answer which you have explained.

From Your explanation,it means that EVI cannot be used in RPGLE program to key the logical file and read the file and get the expected results from the file.

is that correct?

Thanks

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  • TomLiotta
    can we craete encoded vector view as normal logical file and can i use it in my rpgle programs. No. If you create an EVI and issue DSPFD against it, scroll down into the 'Data Base File Attributes' section. Near the end of that section, you see:
    Allow read operation  . . . . . . . . . . . :            No 
    Allow write operation . . . . . . . . . . . :            No 
    Allow update operation  . . . . . . . . . . : ALWUPD     *NO
    Allow delete operation  . . . . . . . . . . : ALWDLT     *NO
    And that's pretty what you'll find if you compile a program over that file and try to issue I/O statements. An EVI isn't intended for you to use directly. (Technically, no SQL indexes are intended to be used directly even though they can be at times.) A basic purpose of an EVI is to give DB2 some objects to work with when you use an ORDER BY clause. That is, the EVI is for DB2 to use, not you. By having one or more pre-built EVIs, ordering can be much more efficient. ...my people are saying that logical files are taking more space on system. Indexes will indeed take space. However, by sharing access paths, total space usage can be minimized. Perhaps the first place to look is the order in which the indexes have been created. It can be possible to reduce the amount of space used by deleting a number of LFs and then recreating them in a more appropriate sequence. Tom
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