EMail Storage PST VS SERVER

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Microsoft Exchange
We are currently evaluating the differences between Server based mail storage and PST Based mail storage. We would like to hear from some people that use each technique and what some of the pros and cons are of each. Thanks for your help.

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Most organisations are moving away from PSTs due to the possibility of loss/corruption.

There is valid use of PSTs for Archive but not as space management to avoid growing large server stores.

Laptop/mobile/home users should use OSTs

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  • Riaan
    Most organisations are moving away from PSTs due to the possibility of loss/corruption. There is valid use of PSTs for Archive but not as space management to avoid growing large server stores. Laptop/mobile/home users should use OSTs
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  • DougPorter
    1) Microsoft Tech Support told me they will not support problems with PST files stored on a networked drive and 'linked' to the local profile for Outlook. This pertains even for Outlook 2003. The biggest cause of PST file corruption, they said, was trying to create and use a PST file stored on a network, as opposed to being created & used on the local PC. 2) PST files are convenient, but searching can be a problem. The free utility "Lookout", now owned by Microsoft, may help aleviate that, since it can index the Mailbox and local files for quicker and more complete searches within Outlook. 3) PST files become unwieldy if they get large (approx. 1gb or so), and have a practical limit at some point. Even 2003 version PST files have a practical limit, although it's larger than the limit for PST files created with earlier versions of Outlook. As a result, extremely large or numerous PST files require careful management by end-users - few users in our company have that kind of awareness and proficiency. I suspect our numbers are typical for most companies. We run Exchange 2003 Standard Edition, with a 10.5gb private database (and a virtually non-existent public database). Two users - out of 100 mailboxes in the information store - have in excess of 1.5 gb worth of PST files, but manage these PST files themselves. They create them locally and copy them to the network for backup purposes. Other than these two users, only the I.T. staff have ever figured out how to manage and effectively use PST files. 5) Backup of local PST files are managed by the end-users (at our company), by copying them to their user-data area on the network. If they fail to manage this part themselves, they lose the data if their PC fails. We don't provide backups of the local PC for this situation - only for engineering applications that can't easily copy data and application-support files to the network.
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  • Carterce
    PST vs E-Mail Archival Systems? We are enjoying both until the PST's are fully migrated into "Enterprise Vault" PST - As stated before, they are prone to data loss / corruption - & SCANPST doesn't always resolve the issue. The client requires read/write access in order to open them and if "locked" by a MAPI session, this causes problems when attempting to back them up. Though some recent PST archival based system claim to get around that. I can only speak about Enterprise Vault (Veritas). - It allows full index searching (including attachments) and is accessble via OWA. You also have the option to have local "vaults" so that users can work off-line. Though this predominately works on a FIFO basis you can indicate specific messages to be downloaded. Downside - you need SQL and secondary - archival storage facilities. So far I've have no complaint. Cathy
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  • Develish
    On the storage front, I see a lot of replies so I will not get in to it. One aspect you also need to factor in -- is Security and data archiving. With PST's and laptops you run the risk of data loss in case of theft or damage. Also, I know of a few cases, where an employee, delivered the mail direct to the Inbox on the PST, bypassing the MSES and then just before leaving the company went and deleted a lot of the data from his PST. While not impossible, it becomes really difficult for the company to re-construct the mails and threads. Regards
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