Drive Mapping with Windows XP

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I've got an odd one here. Situation is a workgroup - Windows 2000 server with a shared drive. Client is Windows XP Professional, SP2. Problem is that I cannot map a drive from the GUI - with or without an LMHOSTS entry for the server. Everyone is on a local subnet. The workstation simply can't see the server - FROM the GUI. Here's the weird part - I can do it if I open the command prompt and do the following: net use 1.2.3.4ipc$ /user:soandso net use t: 1.2.3.4sharename /user:soandso Any clues? I get the feeling that I'm overlooking some fundamental thing here, but I'm too close to the problem to see it. Thanks, Bob

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Sounds like a DNS issue. Ping the server by name and then by IP address. If IP address works but the name does not, the issue will definitely be your DNS entries.

This, of course, is assuming you have the permissions for the share set correctly and that file and print sharing is enabled, which it sounds like is the case.

ipconfig /all will let you see from the client side which server the DNS service is coming from. After tweaking your DNS server, run ipconfig /flushdns and then ipconfig /registerdns on the client and then do the ping test again. If the DNS is properly set you should get a proper resolution for both test pings and then be able to map by name via the GUI.

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  • Bobkberg
    This is a small operation - no DNS other than from their ISP. Although I'll be installing a Windows 2000 Active Directory soon - so that won't be an issue any more. One thing I just did find was that (once again) Microsoft moved where the "Use LMHOSTS" option is. It's on the WINS folder tab under the "Advanced" Button. So I'll try that as soon as I can get back to the customer site. Bob
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  • MithunMCSE
    Hi I was just wondering.. weather if it is possible for you to connect to the shared resource thru GUi with the IP addr and not the server name.. this will let you trouble shoot it a bit easier .. well if u can, then definetly its a name resoultion issue. best regard mithun
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  • Bobkberg
    I did try that - and it didn't work. I believe that the reason the command-line version worked was because I connected to the IPC$ resource - with a valid logon first. Thanks for helping though! Bob
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  • MithunMCSE
    Hi i thot... does it work with the server name in the command line or do you have t type the ip addr to get connected to the share? ... instead of lmhost y not try out the host file... i have never tried it thot.. but might as well gv it a go best regards mithun
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  • Cptrelentless
    Can you open the server up from the run command, i.e. just //server? This could be an issue with the browser master not holding any lists but this should be evident in network places/entire network. Is it just the one share or are none of the shares visible? Don't forget that if as a user you don't provide credentials and try and connect to the drive expecting it to ask for credentials, it won't pop up the dialog box.
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  • Aftabn
    chk to see if the Guest account on the server is enabled, if not then enable it and make sure the passwd is null. hope this helps
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  • Cptrelentless
    Enabling Guest access is not really a wise move on a production server.
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  • Kstair
    Have you tried mapping from the GUI using the IP address instead of the name? Like 1.2.3.4sharename?
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  • Twinboxer
    You may want to check if the Computer Browser and Workstation services are enabled and started.
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  • bmarone
    So bobkberg, #4 above sounds like it's fixed? But in terms of DNS, I thought it was not required on a single small subnet. After WINS and DNS fails, it should fallback to IP broadcast to find the name. I'm pretty sure I've had small networks with no Master Browser, no DNS, and it resolves machines on the subnet just fine, though DNS/HOSTS/LMHOSTS would work better. This all hinges on the NetBIOS Node Type being set correctly in the registry. I also expect the IPC connection would fail if the password was incorrect, and would not impact future connect attempts.
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  • Bobkberg
    It's not fixed. The machine in question is 30 miles from here, so I'm going to test some of the suggestions when I go up to install and configure their new server later this week. Even though the point might be moot for this installation, I'm going to follow up and learn - since who knows when I might encounter another one like it. I'll let you all know the results when I'm done. Bob
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  • ELPUEBLO
    bobkberg wirtes "This is a small operation - no DNS other than from their ISP. Although I'll be installing a Windows 2000 Active Directory soon - so that won't be an issue any more." It's most likely a DNS prob then. Set up your Server to have the DNS Service. Set the Server's DNS to the ISP and all the Workstations DNS to the Server. Try that.
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  • Amigus
    As indicated above resolving hosts without the aid of DNS or WINS on a Windows network requires NetBIOS broadcast. Do an ipconfig /all and make sure you do see that the NetBIOS node type is set to "Broadcast" (0x1) and that you don't see a message saying NetBIOS is disabled. If the settings are not as above you can turn on NetBIOS in the TCP/IP advanced settings or by DHCP and you can set the node-type in DHCP or the registry: http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;en-us;160177
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  • ELPUEBLO
    At the risk of being repetivtive, the DNS problem sounds like this. Computer 1 is set to look out to ISP's DNS Server 2 is a private ip (or in my case someone else's IP behind a couple of NATs . . . not my fault they've changed what the Private IPs are in last 10 years. anyway. . .) When computer 1 asks outside DNS where is my private IP the DNS looks all over the internet for it, so if the server is not public (and doesn't have a real (read registered) Domain (or in this case any Domain) DNS is Dumbfounded. Set your server up as a DNS Server when (or even b4) u do your AD (and a DCHP too) then set the server's Net Adapter to the DNS of ISP. set All your clinets (either though DCHP or manually) DNS to the Server.
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