Domain Backup

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Tags:
DataCenter
DHCP
DNS
Microsoft Exchange
Networking
Networking services
Project management
Hello, I had this problem, my domain was deactivated last week. Due to some billing conflict, but it's now back to full operational. However, my boss asked me if I could make a back up plan for the domain. So my question is, will a dual domain pointing to the same DNS server is ok? Like domain1.com and domain2.com pointing to one dns server. And how will it affect my email system? Hope to hear from you guys soon. Thanks in advance.

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To judge from the description, your question sounds like a DNS question. What to do when the ISP removes the domain reference for domian xyz.com? This is essential stuff – so setup an alert so you remember to pay the bill, and confirm that it is payed.
You can have 2 domains registered in the same DNS pointing to the same IP-addresses – no problem there. But you cannot DNS wise configure automatic failover between the 2 (when you forget to pay the bill). People browsing your webpage or sending you email will have to know the other domain name (loosing your dns records is like loosing the street address).
You can control the TTL value for your dns records but this can be overruled by clients and other DNS servers.
So keeping your hostmaster happy – that’s what you want to do.

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  • Guardian
    I think you need to keep your accounts up-to-date!
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  • Petroleumman
    Hello, I'm curious as to how a billing issue brought your domain down? Is this a hosted domain scenario where your paying someone else to host your domain like a service? As to your question, there really is no clean way to create a true fail-over for an entire domain which would allow you to pull the plug on one seamlessly fail over to the next. But yes it is totally possible to have one DNS server host records for multiple domains. Good Luck!
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  • GroundZ
    Yes, we are paying another organization to hosting our domain. So when there's a complain in the billing, they decided to deactivate our domain. Which by the way without informing us that they will deactivate it. So in effect, our clients mail to us bounced back. I can't seem to understand the idea of TTL in dns. I may have to look on this. Anyone who enlighten me with this topic? Thanks...
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  • BrantWellsTFC
    TTL in a DNS is like saying how long the DNS server will go without updating it's DNS records to the outside world. for instance domain1 starts off as 1.1.1.1 and your TTL is 8 hours.... Let's say domain1 changes to 2.2.2.2, once you make the change in the DNS server itself, it will take 8 hours before it starts populating to the outside world. Populating across the whole planet usually takes a day or two.
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  • Petroleumman
    Hello, You know if management is willing to spend the money to purchase the equipment needed to build and maintain a 'back up domain', then why not pull your data away from your hosting service and run your infrastucture in house? Over the long haul this would probably be the more cost effective way to go and the immediate return is that now you will have complete control of your environment. This is what I'd be selling to management if I were in your shoes! Good Luck!
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  • FlyNavy
    WOW. If it is really a short term, non-recurring ISP billing issue and they disconnected your service, I would seriously look for another ISP!
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  • GroundZ
    Actually, in terms of DNS server management, I have no problem. But it's with registration of my domain where I had the problem. What happened was, my dns server was ok, however the org that where we registered our domain deactivated our domain from our account. Meaning I have my DNS running but I have no domain.
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  • Stevesz
    From what I gather reading the comments here, yu own a domain name. You pay a hosting company to host your web site and e-mail. When thre is a billing dispute, the site gets shut down (I suspect that it is not without notice--you just don't get the notice passed along from those who pay the bills). You are looking for a solution to prevent his from happening the next time the bill is not paid. First, gain full control of the domain name, both administratively and technically. This way, you hve control of the domain, and it is difficult for anyone to do anything without your say so. Second, consider what you may bring in house. Your own mail server? Your web site? Both? You'll need at least a T-1 for this and a range of IP addresses. It may very well be less expensive to do this in house than to farm it out. Your currentr hosting company should be able to give you bandwidth usage stats to help you determine a course of action. Mail is the easiest to bring in house, but it is possible to do both, depending on your bandwidth needs. If you need to keep a hosting situation for one or the other or both, start looking around at other hosting situations. Working with one of my clients, we found a local company that has been very good to us, and is very helpful. We have a good rapport with the techs, and they are very responsive to us. We are now suggesting them to other clients looking for a hosting solution. We also work with another hosting company that happens to be across the hallway from our offices, and also have a good rapport with them. They are out there, you just need to look. Creating a backup domain will not resolve your current woes, but may multiply them, so long as an outside hosting company is used. Your e-mail is probvably the most important, and having that in house is probably the best way to go. Your company can probably withstand an outage of the web server for a few days much better than an outage of e-mail for the same amount of time. Steve//
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  • BHawthorne
    To answer the initial question: Your DNS server can handle any number of domains. A low end box can handle thousands of DNS requests an hour and the number of domains is only limited by disk. You can have multiple DNS names pointed to a single source box. m1.domain1.com and m1.domain2.com can easily be the same instance on the same machine. That goes for MX records as well as A, or any other. What you cannot do is failover your mail if the problem is the service provider cutting your To domain off. You can have an alternate, and send that out to people, but it won't help with mail sent to the original domain until the registration is cleared up.
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