Trouble setting up virtual machines on DNS

35 pts.
Tags:
DHCP
DNS
Virtualization
VMware
windows 2003
Windows Server 2003
Windows Server 2003 Enterprise Edition
I'm using VMplayer to play with a few networking concepts and can't get DNS to work on a Win 2003 server.  I setup a few VMs including an XP, Windows 2000 Workstation, and a Win 2003 Enterprise Server.  I used the "add roles" tool to make the server a domain controller along with DNS and DHCP.
Right now I'm just trying to get DNS to work.  My home network is 192.168.1.0 and when I setup VMs with the Network adapter set to NAT it sets up the network to 192.168.152.0 with the gateway at 192.168.152.2. All the VMs work fine using this and have internet access.
When I promoted the Win2003 VM to DC it set the static IP on the VM to 192.168.0.1 with itself as the gateway.  The scope in DNS is set right and the forwarder is set for "All other domains" to 192.168.152.2. 
I set a static IP of 192.168.0.200 with gateway and DNS server set to 192.168.0.1 on the XP VM and can of course ping the server but can't get out anywhere with a web request.  I thought this should work, when I send a request for a web site, it should go to my 2003 VM which of course can't resolve it so it should forward it to be resolved by 192.168.152.2.  What am I missing?


Software/Hardware used:
Homemade Windows 7 box with I7 processor and 9 GB RAM hosting VMs run by VMplayer

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  • carlosdl
    Is there a reason why you need to use NAT ? I would think it should be easier using bridged networking. This way all of your machines would be in the same subnet. Have you tried that ?
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  • Dave57
    Well no particular reason really. Actually I have the 2003 box set for bridged mode now so it picks up an address in the 192.168.1.0 network now but of course I changed it to a static address (192.168.0.1) when I promoted the server. I even added another virtual NIC to the 2003 box and let it pick up the DHCP assigned address in the 192.168.1.0 network thinking this would act as the route between the two networks. I guess I could just change that static address on the server to one in the original net and get rid of the other virtual NIC, set up everything that way and try it. On the XP box would it really matter anyway since I set that one static too. I don't really know how VMplayer sets up its virtual networking. I guess if you choose Bridged when setting up a machine it's going to setup a virtual switch for you but if you choose NAT, it should be setting up a virtual router and switch, is that right?
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  • carlosdl
    Yes, I would assign the server a static address from your host's network, and would do the same with the other VMs. In bridged mode all VMs can network with the host and with all of other VMs as well without the need of gateways between them. They will work as if they were physical machines all in the same subnet (if the appropriate ip addresses are assigned, of course).
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  • saturno
    Hi, I think the main basic concept here is that you can't have hosts (servers or workstations, tec.) in diferent subnets which are not routed. I.e. Don't have a router, RRAS (routing and remote access sevrer) or being NAT'ed in this case by VMWare (NAT is normally made by a router). Every subnet needs to have the "knowledge" on how to reach other subnet's/networks to be able to communicate with them. This is why you can't communicate between 192.168.0.X and the internet/other subnets. The suggestion made by Carlosdl is the easyest way to get youre environment working without struggling with network subnets and routing. Just use bridged networking in all your VM's with your host network (192.168.1.X) and you're done. Regards, Luís
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  • Dave57
    Well, it works fine with everything in the same network and it works fine even using the NATed network 192.168.152.0 since VMware provides the virtual router I guess linking 192.168.1.0 and 192.168.152.0. I just thought I could use two virtual NICs in the 2003 Server, one set on the 192.168.0.0 network and another one either on 192.168.1.0 or 192.168.152.0 and the machine itself would serve as the router. I couldn't ever get that to work. Dave
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  • carlosdl
    Good to read it worked. A Windows server could act as a router, but it won't happen automatically, some configurations are needed, which I think are done in the RRAS console. You might want to give it a try if you still want to experiment with this. I'm not sure it will work though.
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  • Dave57
    Hey Carlos, just figured that out and got back on here to relay that. I forgot that you actually have to "turn on" routing services on the 2003 box (duh!). It's been a while since I messed with this stuff. Soon as I turned on the routing it worked fine! Thanks for your input! Dave
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