DNS problem with Microsoft Outlook

1,545 pts.
Tags:
DNS
Outlook
Windows Server 2003
I have a network (server client) the server is Windows Server 2003. I installed Root DNS & DHCP on it. All clients are Windows XP SP2. This network connects with the Internet through an ADSL router. My problem is with Microsoft Outlook for clients. I couldn't send or receive any message when the primary DNS of clients is the DNS of my LAN and the secondary is the DNS of the ISP. But when I invert the primary with the secondary, then I could send and receive messages, but log on to the network takes a long time. The Internet is working in both states. Please tell me what I can do for this problem. Thank you.
ASKED: September 15, 2008  3:48 PM
UPDATED: September 19, 2008  3:50 PM

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When setting up your LAN you want to have only your internal DNS servers IPs and the DNS servers on your clients as well as on your servers. For example if your servers IP is 192.168.0.3, all of your clients and servers should have only 192.168.0.3 as the only DNS server.

What do you mean by Root DNS? After installing the DNS Service on the server DNS should resolve for all clients to the public internet as long as the server has internet access.

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  • CosmoC
    It sounds to me like your DNS is actually setup as a true "root" server. If so, you won't be able to resolve anything outside your local DNS. You want DNS requests to use forwarders for anything it cannot resolve locally. If you haven't already, make sure you remove the root DNS zone. 1. Open DNS Manager. Expand the DNS Server object. Expand the Forward Lookup Zone 2. Right-click the "." zone, and then click Delete If your ISP is hosting EMail or your website, you might want to add their DNS as a forwarder 1. Open DNS Manager. Right-click the DNS Server object. Click Properties 2. Click the Forwarders tab 3. Click to select the Enable Forwarders check box 4. In the IP address box, type the ISP's DNS server, click Add You will want to flush the clients DNS cache to test. 1. Open a command prompt 2. Type "ipconfig /flushdns" (without quotes)
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