DNS Old NT network

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Availability
DHCP
DNS
Networking
Networking services
I have an old NT network with a DNS server on a W2Kserver. The DNS server was never installed correctly and I do not know that much about it. Also, it is in very bad shape and I am afraid to do too much to it. I have two locations connect over Frame relay. One location has the NT domain controllers and mainly NT workstations. The other site does not have any servers and all XP workstations. I usually set up the XP computers at the main site with the domain controllers and join the domain. The XP computers that are sent to the remote site need an LMHost file to tell them how to connect to the domain. Then they connect fine. However, I am setting up two XP computers in the remote location and they can not find the NT domain controller to find the domain. Can anyone help me? Also feel free to explain it to me like I am a 5 year old.

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Hello,

Do you have a WINS server running on your network? If not, try setting one up. NT relys on NetBIOS as it’s primary method of name resolution and not DNS like W2k and W2k3 does. Point your computers at the WINS server after you’ve got it up and running. You can do this through DHCP if your using it, or add it to the local area connection – tcp/ip properties if your using static addressing. This may help.

Good Luck

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  • TedRizzi
    Nt4, used netbios and wins to find domain controllers,, there would be a wins service record for each domain controller, and that is how it would know what servers provided login services. w2k and xp like DNS instead. windows dns servers have srv records that tell w2k and xp where domain controllers are, w2k and xp still have netbios support, but microsoft really encourages you to use dns and not wins. You didnt mention if you had a wins server,, if your not going to use DNS for name resolution you should have a wins server running.. but in all honesty, your best bet would be to set up a windows dns serve, if the majority of your clients are now running xp, you should seriously consider upgrading your domain to an active directory network. xp and w2k, will can use netbios, and wins, but natively will try dns first,
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  • Jtennyson
    My remote site is on a different subnet and running over frame relay. There is a WINS server specified in DNS. I am also using hosts and lmhosts files. When I set the machine up in the location with the servers I can join the domain. After I join the domain the lmhost file will direct the computer to the domain controller from the remote location. However, even with the lmhost file the XP machine can not find the NT domain controller to join the network.
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  • Petroleumman
    Hello, Here's a thought, Your remote site is on a seperate subnet which I assume is routed? When your attempting to join new XP machines to the domain they are sending a broadcast to locate a DC. Your router by default will block broadcast traffic across subnets which will prevent your PC's from finding a DC located on a different subnet. You mentioned before that your standard operation was to join a machine in the same subnet where your DC's reside then move it to the remote subnet. I bet if you followed this practice with these new machines you'd be ok. Good luck!
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  • Jtennyson
    The machines I am trying to join to the domain are in Mexico. The main site is in Illinois
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