Different modulation schemes

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Networking
Is it possible to communicate using different kinds of modems over a communication link, such as two modems that uses different modulation schemes or an asynchronous modem on one side and a synchronous modem on the other?

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In literal direct answer to your question – No.

However many modems have many different modes, so to really answer the question, you’d have to read up on the specs for any given brand (or brands).

However – when you mix synchronous and asynchronous in the same sentence, you’re asking for trouble – or at least difficulty.

Look at it from a simple language exchange. If I speak only German to you (and I don’t understand English), and you speak only English to me (and don’t understand German), the chances of our communicating are essentially zero.

The entire reason for protocols goes back to ancient court behavior. A protocol is a pre-defined, pre-agreed-upon standard of behavior. If you don’t perform the right behaviors to convey the message – you’re dead!

In the computer/networking world, protocols can take many forms: Physical (voltage, polarity, wavelength/frequency, syncronization – tied to a master clock), Timing and Ordering. A specific pattern in one place may (or may not) have the same meaning as the same pattern in a different place.

Now that I’ve gotten off my soapbox, let me ask you what I hope is a simple question: What are you actually trying to accomplish? That is – your end objective, not any technical details that might be blocking your way.

Bob

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  • Paul144hart
    No - the modem is the connection to the telephone line, and it has the modulator / demodulator in it. The other side has to be another modem that can communicate with the modem. Since these also handle call control, two different modems could be wired to the same phone line, but on the receiving end there is no way to determine who should answer and two modems tried answering neither would be sucessful (most likely) in the negoiation phase.
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  • Yipych
    I've encountered those problem when I am studying computers networks. However, I don't know how / where can I solve those problems, so I post the questions here to seek help. Thanks all.
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  • Bobkberg
    At the risk of sounding offensive - Which is not my intention, I suspect that you may not have a clear picture of the problem(s) you're trying to solve. You said in your last post "when I am studying". Are you still a student? Are you studying as part of learning your job? Or are you studying to solve a particular problem? Your original question was both specific and vague in that you were asking about modems, but with no particular direction or objective. While most of the regular contributors in this forum are willing to help, you need to work a little more at defining exactly what sort of information you are looking for. If you could restate your question describing the particular problem you are facing, this would make it easier for us to help. Bob
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