DHCP conflicts after adding a wireless router

1,110 pts.
Tags:
DHCP
DHCP Configuration
Static IP address
Static IP Configuration
Wireless router
Wireless router configuration
We added a wireless router to the corporate network and we are getting loads of DHCP conflicts. Can you help us resolve this without having to do static IP addresses manually.
ASKED: July 7, 2011  6:48 PM
UPDATED: March 31, 2012  10:08 PM

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You have decisions to make. Is the corporate DHCP your only DHCP provider or will you have the wireless router provide DHCP? Will you use NAT on the wireless router? Does the wireless router have a firewall and will you manage it?

My suggestion is to disable DHCP, NAT and the firewall on the wireless router (turning it basically into a wireless AP). Then manage IP addresses through your central DHCP.

Otherwise carve out an IP segment for the wireless router separate from your central DHCP and assign that as the DHCP pool on the wireless router.

The decision on NAT is up to you but if you need to access network resources from the wireless segment turning off NAT is a no brainer.

Using the wireless router’s firewall inside your network in a hassle you probably will not want. My suggestion is to turn it off.

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  • Mattcassell
    Is the router setup to provide DHCP to connecting clients? If so you need to make sure the scope that the router can provide is not included in your corporate DHCP scope. Due to some restrictions in routing you may simply need to create the exclusion list on your DHCP server and then once all machines refresh their IP you would be covered. However, if you router is simply providing the built in scope that is not in your corporate DHCP scopes then you may have another similar device plugged into your network that you are not aware of.
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