DB2 for Z/OS and DB2 for LINUX / WINDOWS/ AS400

5 pts.
Tags:
AS/400
AS/400 DB2
IBM DB2
IT careers
z/OS
I have around 5 years of IT experience in Mainframe and Midrange operations. As I'm more intersted in database administration, recently I did IBM DB2 9 Fundamentals certification and also IBM Mainframe application development course ( JCL,VSAM,COBOL,DB2,CICS) but it was 5 years back. I want to go for professional certification in DB2 for Z/OS as I'm more interested in mainframe than AS/400. can anyone suggest me if I can start my DBA career with fundamentals certification or do I need professional certification as well? if I need to go for professional certification, which is the best DB2 for Z/OS of AS/400? which one has a beter demand in the present market?

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You say you prefer z/OS over mid-range, so why not go the z/OS route? You MUST enjoy your work or live an unhappy life.

I know many people who have certs in database, and specifically DB2.
But I do not possess any certs. I’ve been working with DB2 on z/OS (and its predecessors os/390 & MVS) since 1987 (that would be version 1.2).

Some people like to hire folks with certs. Some do not care. I am one who does not care. I ask detailed, technical questions during interviews. Some people with certs cannot answer them.

The only time certs would matter to me is that it shows a willingness to follow up on your own. It shows some initiative. But it does not truly prove how good one is. It proves book learning. it proves some knowledge. But it does not prove the ability to think outside the box when you get a 3:00 am phone call.

Your 5 year old knowledge is still good. All you have missed out on is the “new” stuff. But the old stuff (99%) is still valid. VSAM is still VSAM, and so on.

As far as the demand for DBA skills, well that varies a LOT depending on location and money and … Right now, there a lot of unemployed technical people. But there are also want ads looking for people. Would you move? That will certainly help with finding the demand.

Much of DB2 knowledge is transferable between big DB2 and little DB2. I haven’t worked much with little DB2 since the OS/2 days back in the 90s. But a lot of my knowledge is still valid – but I am out of practice, of course. But things like the catalog are almost the exact same. concepts are the same. hot & cold backups are the same (although the files are different).

Other things are not interchangeable between the 2 – buffer pools, EDM pool. And command syntax (not SQL, but COMMANDS) differs a LOT. But they accomplish much the same stuff.

I say follow your heart and go with Big Iron DB2 but also learn some little DB2.

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  • Znason
    Been in IT (think we called Data Processing years ago) for around 44 years. Anyone every worked on IBM's 1401? Seen it all... for me, I'm staying with AS/400 (I still like that name!).
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  • Lovemyi
    I would recommend that you stay with the z/OS route due to all the technical skills you have learned so you can manage the database with all it's requirements. The AS/400/iSeries/IBM i DB2 database runs itself so you do not have to get into all the details that Oracle or even DB2 on other platforms need to do. The IBM i DB2 only needs DBAs for some of the larger companies that need new SQL indexes created for some of the newer and larger application packages like SAP and JD Edward. IF you want to get down into the nitty gritty of the database then IBM i is not the DB2 you want to focus on becasue it is self healing and correcting and you do not have to worry about allocating space, etc. Lovemyi
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  • CharlieBrowne
    I started in Data Processing ;-) in 1967. Started on Unit record equipment wiring panels. Eventually moved to 360/20. And like Znason, I will never leave the AS400 no matter what you call it.
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  • Meandyou
    Znason & CharlieBrowne, I am not quite as mature as you two. I've been doing this for about 36 years. Yup. we called it "DP" back then. Some of my mentors called it "EDP" (electronic data processing). Lots of initialisms since then - IP, IS, MIS, too many to recollect. No, never worked on a 1401. Oldest machine I worked on was an RCA Spectra something. (similar architecture as IBM; same assembler, etc). Sometimes I feel old. Like just now my knees are killing me. :-)
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