Critical storage lower limit reached

45 pts.
Tags:
AS/400
i5/OS
IBM i
iSeries
Journal Receivers
QEZJOBLOG
Hi, How can one check the sizes of journal receivers if they were deleted and the system IPL'ed and joblogs in QEZJOBLOG are also deleted?

Software/Hardware used:
i5/OS V5R4

Answer Wiki

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If journal receivers are deleted they occupy no space. ditto if joblogs have been removed.

The tradition hunt the space game starts with DSPOBJD *ALL *ALLUSR to an outfile, run a query / sql over it to report the largest object sizes and who owns them, run more queries – identify and destroy

repeat weekly/ daily – build it into housekeeping routine.

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  • philpl1jb
    You may find that large amounts of space are tied up in deleted records because when records are deleted from Physical Files they continue to occupy space (unless the file is set to ReUseDeleted). If this is the case you will need to run the RGZPFM command to reorganize the files that have large numbers of deleted records. Phil
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  • CharlieBrowne
    To find your large objects on the system, submit the RTVDSKINF command. It is best if a USRPRF that has SECOFR authority do the submit, Onces it completes you can PRTDSKINF to find large objects from anywhere on the system. I have RTVDSKINF scheduled to submit every weekend so my PRTDSKINF is kept current.
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  • TomLiotta
    Without knowing the characteristics of your system, there's no way to know what is using space. Many current systems have far more space used by streamfiles than all their database files put together. Also, many modern database files use different kinds of LOBs but don't have appropriate ALLOCATE() values set. For those, reuse of deleted records often won't help. Complete reorganizations are necessary to recover a meaningful amount of space from those. (An interrupted reorg won't help.) A review of the count of deleted records might show no deleted record space at all because the slots get reused, but a huge amount of fragmented space might have accumulated in the overflow area. If you seem to be running low on space, you need to start by finding out where the space is being used. Without knowing that, anything you do has as good a chance of being a waste of time as being a help. Use RTVDSKINF to get a snapshot of database usage. Use RTVDIRINF to track directory/streamfile usage. After collecting the info, use PRTDSKINF and PRTDIRINF to report on usage. Tom
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  • TomLiotta
    How can one check the sizes of journal receivers if they were deleted... Restore them and see what size they report. If they were deleted and they weren't tracked while they existed, there's no way to know their sizes without getting them back. Tom
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  • JediK
    [...] 5. Philpl1jb and CharlieBrowne offered the approved answer on RPG date retrieval. 6. Check out the community suggestions for what to do when critical storage lower limit is reached. [...]
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