how do I remove cpiad0b from qhst or stop it going there in the first place

15 pts.
Tags:
IBM
QHST
V4R5M0
how do I remove cpiad0b from qhst or stop it going there in the first place

Software/Hardware used:
R5V4M5
ASKED: June 22, 2010  2:51 PM
UPDATED: June 24, 2010  2:15 AM

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CPIAD0B is “*SIGNON server job &3/&2/&1 processing request for user &4 on &5 in subsystem &6 in &7.”

You stop it by not running your *SIGNON server. Why would you not want network signons to be logged? Why would you want to remove evidence of network signons?

Technically, you can delete records from the QHST* files if you wish. I would never do it though. It removes audit information that might be critical in later analysis.

A RPG program can do the work. Make sure that you study the QHST* file carefully first. There are multiple records for most messages.

Tom

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  • Avitrha
    The entries are caused by a Wintel server (MQ iSeries adaptor) polling the iSeries around 20 times a second, every second, every minute of the day, which makes finding any other messages in QHST almost impossible
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  • TomLiotta
    ...Wintel server (MQ iSeries adaptor) polling the iSeries around 20 times a second, every second, every minute of the day... It's understandable wanting to remove or suppress those messages. Other than RPG (or whatever HLL language) to process the QHST* files, I can't think of what you might do in the short term. Long term, however, you have a couple options. First, get hold of whomever created the MQ process and have them fix it. There should be no reason to hit the *SIGNON server more than once in a session. (Technically, you don't have to hit the *SIGNON server at all. You can connect directly to whatever host servers are being used.) It might be IBM due to internal MQ function. It might be a 3rd-party vendor of an app that you run on the Wintel server. Or it might be an in-house app. But there's no reason that *SIGNON credentials can't be used for a session. If there are new sessions -- creating new connections -- 20 times a second, then that app needs serious re-working. Otherwise, signon once and re-use the connections until the service ends. (There might be one subsequent connection to the Remote Command/Distributed Program Call host server, a second connection to the Data Queue host server and possibly one or two others.) If the remote app behaves properly, the issue should never arise. In addition, consider that there might be alternatives to looking for messages in QHST*. If you don't look through QHST*, it's not as important how cluttered it might be. Because I work with host server programming, I have reason to look at QHST* once in a while, possibly as often as once every two or three weeks. The various servers log messages such as CPIAD0B that I need to check from time to time. But I'm not always certain that there are no better ways to check for other kinds of QHST* messages. See if you can list a couple of the most common reasons you look at QHST*. Maybe there are suggestions for better alternatives. Until a good solution is available for your current problem, an alternative might ease some trouble for a while. As for programming to remove QHST* records, the best place to start is a basic search in the Information Center for your version of the OS. Search for { format history log }. The first few items provide a good description of how rows in QHST* need to be processed. There are a couple details that can be covered if/when you decide to go forward with it. That about covers things for me, unless it gets into details. Sorry I don't have a better answer. Tom
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