Compare & Contrast Windows and Linux OS Schemas

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Microsoft Windows
Hi all, I am taking an Introduction to UNIX class and this week we are to compare and contrast the Windows and Linux OS schemas. My question is: what is the schema of an OS? Is it as simple as the directory structure of the installed OS? Our text book has been pretty useless as it is a guide to Linux Script Programming. I have tried Googling it as well and found 1000's of hits but most have to do with databases. For this assignment, I am comparing Win XP Pro (my current OS) and Knoppix 3.6 for Linux (we are using Linux Terminal to emulate UNIX commands for classroom assignments). I'm not looking for someone to do my work, just point me in the right direction! Please! Thanks.

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This is kind of an open question. Could you be more specific. Are you trying to compare memory allocation and usage, kernels, ease of use… I think to answer this we need more clarification.

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  • Sequential
    This is kind of an open question. Could you be more specific. Are you trying to compare memory allocation and usage, kernels, ease of use... I think to answer this we need more clarification.
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  • Tturner33
    This is right out of the syllabus. I guess I am comparing the OS architectures. Thanks. "Submit a 700-1,050 word paper in APA format that identifies the similarities and the differences of the two operating system schemas. Include what the philosophical differences between the two are and how it effects the operation of the two Operating Systems. You are comparing the OS architectures."
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  • Cscottmitchell
    I agree the question is ambiguous. I've never heard of an "OS Schema" , only a database schema. Maybe they want to know the difference in the filesystem structure, e.g. a root directory concept in Linux/Unix doesn't exist in Windows and in Linux there is a /usr , /tmp, /var, /etc, /home, /bin dirs which again don't exist in Windows. Sorry I can't be more helpful.
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  • Bobkberg
    As already pointed out, I've only seen database schemas. However...being ready to plunge into wild (ok, tame) speculation at the drop of a question mark.... There are several aspects one could potentially consider. As mentioned, there is the file system structure. There is also the system of libraries and how they tie into the use of the O/S, There is the plethora (don't get to use that word very often) of highly specialized system calls in Windows (some of which are forbidden to non-MS software by case law - don't get me started on that), each of which takes up more memory, disk space, CPU time, etc. than their Unix/Linux counterparts. This leads to the well-known phenomenon of bloat - whereby systems which can no longer effectively run Windows do just fine with Unix/Linux in it's various flavors. If you mean authentication and access methods to resources, then MS has Workgroup, NT4-style domains, and W2K (and beyond) Active Directory. Compare that to local *nix resources, NFS Mounts, YP/NIS/NIS+/LDAP, etc. That's all that comes to my tired mind at the moment. Bob
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  • FlyNavy
    O/S architecture was covered pretty heavily in MS classes and I found a similar discussion on general Linux architecture. Try the 2 links below (hopefully, this is what the prof is looking for): Linux Architecture model - http://plg.uwaterloo.ca/~itbowman/CS746G/a1/ Windows 2000 Architecture Model - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Architecture_of_Windows_2000
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  • Tjones
    I always like to work starting from the general toward the specific. In this matter, to answer the "general" case, first ask "What is a schema?" Once you better understand what a schema is then you can see how that concept applies to operation systems. I think that this website (http://windows.stanford.edu/docs/glossary.htm) may help push you in the right direction, at least for the "Windows schema" part of the question.
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  • JacobLnConsulting
    The term, 'schema' here is used as a synonym for the more familar term associated with OSs - architecture. Bear in mind that the word was in use long before applied to automatons. OSs DO have a schema, just as they have an architecture. Some schemes: memory managmement, process definition, resource allocation, kernel operation, file systems (although not technically an OS component, but a layer upon an OS. Hence, diff file systems are used with a particular core OS), protection and access modes and so on. I suggest you ask the instructor to clarify what he/she is looking for - a discussion of general topics like I've listed, or describing a small number of selected topics. In either case, the more you write (assuming you're economical with your words) the more you'll benefit from the exercise. With a deep comprehension of Windows and Linux (incl a few derivatives), you'll have an excellent foundation for further CS work.
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  • Tturner33
    Thanks for your help everyone. I have plenty of research material to finish my project now. I greatly appreciate the guidance. Thanks again.
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