Change database size priv.edb and pub.edb

pts.
Tags:
Exchange security
Microsoft Exchange
We run Exchange 5.5 sp 4. In the start up indicates the ability for 16 gb for data base size. Priv.edb size is at 4 GB with 179 mb freespace left. Offline defrag will only reclaim 388 mb. Pub.edb size 180 mb with 138 mb freespace left. Offline defrag will only reclaim around 50 mb Istalled new 146 hd scsi. Ran Exchange disk optimizer did not change status of freespace for either priv or pub.edb. How do I get it to move to the 16 GB or higher barrier for the priv.edb. and upto at least 1 GB or better for the pub.edb. Running out of time, getting users to clean up and delete only works for the short term. David Jones

Answer Wiki

Thanks. We'll let you know when a new response is added.

Hey David,

My experience (we run the same EX5.5 Version) is that the .edb file a dynamic ‘file’. So i grows until 16GB and then it stops working (we had this last year). When the system says it’s 4GB it is 4 Gb large. When it’s says it’s got x Mb free, it just indicates that there’s place (x Mb) free before the 4 GB starts to grown. I’m pretty sure you’ve got 12 Gb free space (16-4). Oh yes, 16 Gb is the limit for Exchange 5.5 !!

Ivo

Discuss This Question: 4  Replies

 
There was an error processing your information. Please try again later.
Thanks. We'll let you know when a new response is added.
Send me notifications when members answer or reply to this question.

REGISTER or login:

Forgot Password?
By submitting you agree to receive email from TechTarget and its partners. If you reside outside of the United States, you consent to having your personal data transferred to and processed in the United States. Privacy
  • Markr74969
    I believe Ivo is exactly correct. So long as you have adequate free disk space on the drive holding the edb file you'll be fine. The file(s) will re-size as needed up to the high limit of 16GB. Plot your edb growth and plan a path out of 5.5 when you see 16gb coming at you. Mark
    0 pointsBadges:
    report
  • Swiftd
    The 16GB edb limit is for any version of Exchange that's not the "Enterprise" version. You're not going to get anything more than that with Exchange 2000 or 2003 unless you buy the Enterprise version. Exchange 5.5 Enterprise can grow to 16TB. However, if you have Exchange Standard 2003, you can increase the database size to 18GB or install SP2 and increase it up to 75GB. https://thesource.ofallevil.com/technet/prodtechnol/exchange/guides/WhatNewE2k3/e14c6028-9f8d-41a7-b981-4b1e7e867b3a.mspx?mfr=true However, none of that helps you unless you have the money to fork out on either the new version of Exchange or the Enterprise version. You would be at risk to both upgrade to 2003 and increase the database size at the same time. You can add a new Exchange 5.5 Standard server to the site and split your mailboxes between the two servers. To prevent bloat, you could limit mailbox sizes - but users don't like it. You might try running the eseutil /d to see if you can shrink the size of the file down prior to any upgrades/changes. Eseutil runs about 4-6 GB an hour to defragment the database. Good luck, Don
    0 pointsBadges:
    report
  • ALVXSE87
    Well, all the suggestions given were correct. However, assuming you don't have the instant money to buy upgrade versions, your only option is to --- 1. Create individual PST files for all your users. Note though that Outlook PST files have 2 GB limit, therefore before it reaches 2 GB you have to teach your users how to chop their files into smaller PST files. Then - 2.a Configure their Outlook to use Rules Wizard so that it automatically re-route incoming emails to the PST file OR 2.b Configure e-mail delivery in Outlook/Tools/Services/Delivery Tab ---> Deliver new mail to the following location ---> select the PST file you created. Hope this helps. alma
    0 pointsBadges:
    report
  • BSchorr
    Where are you getting the information about how much freespace is left? Stop and restart the Information Store service and see if that resets the size of your EDB file - the others are basically correct, though. By the way - the suggestion to move your data to PST files should be considered a last resort. PST files are subject to all kinds of other problems including the fact that you probably don't do backups of your workstation hard drives (and placing PST files on network shares is not a supported configuration) and non-Unicode PST files corrupt pretty easily when the size gets into the area of 2GB. -Ben-
    0 pointsBadges:
    report

Forgot Password

No problem! Submit your e-mail address below. We'll send you an e-mail containing your password.

Your password has been sent to:

To follow this tag...

There was an error processing your information. Please try again later.

REGISTER or login:

Forgot Password?
By submitting you agree to receive email from TechTarget and its partners. If you reside outside of the United States, you consent to having your personal data transferred to and processed in the United States. Privacy

Thanks! We'll email you when relevant content is added and updated.

Following